Courses Spring 2018*

Core Courses

Foundational Modules

Advanced Modules

Electives

Language Courses

*The course list may be subject to change.

Core Courses

IS104 Forms of Love

AY/BA1/Begin in Berlin Core Course

Module: Medieval Literatures and Cultures

Instructors: Tracy ColonyDavid HayesGeoff LehmanKatalin MakkaiHans Stauffacher

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

 "Love" is a word whose meanings seem to be known to all of us. It names a feeling, an experience, and a value whose importance appears incontestable. But did "love" always mean what we might consider it to mean today? How recent are ideals of romantic or sexual love? What kinds of prototypes did they have in earlier historical periods? To what extent is our word "love" equivalent to the terms used for it in the languages and cultures that have shaped European and so-called "Western" culture? This course explores the other meanings for the word "love" that contributed to our contemporary perspective or apparently diverge markedly from it. We focus on texts and ideas from the place and time that was foundational for the development of European societies, and yet seems distant and strange now: medieval Christendom. We look at the change that took place in the use of Ancient philosophical terms for love in Christian texts, and at the consequences (literary and doctrinal) of the condemnatory view of sexual and erotic love taken by Christian theology. Above all, we examine the ramifications of the primacy of the category of love in Christendom: how could this category become so all-important, and yet at the same time express such a hostility to the erotic and the sensual? The course looks at the norms, rituals and rhetoric that organized the idea of love in the medieval world, attending also to the relationship between Christianity, Judaism and Islam. 

IS212 Early Modern Science (a cooperation with the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science)

BA2 Core Course

Module: Early Modern Science

Instructors: Ewa AtanassowMichael WeinmanRodolfo GarauIan Lawson

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

The course seeks to introduce the scientific advances of the early modern period (with particular focus on the seventeenth century): the developments that defined the principles, methods and frameworks of modern natural science as it exists today.  We not only explore the philosophical basis and conclusions of this historical development, but its experimental procedures, and come to an understanding of their practical form and the meaning of their results. In the first section, we concentrate on the new understanding of space, matter and motion deriving from the cosmologies and mechanical theories of this era (the basis of modern physics). In the second, we consider the remarkable advances in the life sciences at this period (examining anatomical and medical texts), and finally, attend to the emergence of what came to be called "chemistry" out of the mystical practice of alchemy. Included in the course are visits to exhibitions and collections in Berlin, which will help us to reflect on the way in which scientific practices and their discoveries have been historicized, and why we ought to enhance our critical awareness of such historicizing. 

IS322 Modernism, Cosmopolitanism, and the Aesthetics of Internationalism

BA3-4/PY Core Course

Module: Modernism

Coordinator: Laura Scuriatti

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

In the aesthetic and cultural moment we identify as Modernism, newness in art became a defining value. At the beginning of the twentieth century, experiments in style, technique and content characterized the arts and generated close interdisciplinary dialogue between them. Modernist experimentation also had, in some cases, socio-political implications: while some authors and artists lived cosmopolitan lives, numerous avant-garde and modernist movements questioned the meaning of national identities and boundaries, both politically and culturally. Focusing on a broad range of modernist texts, visual and theoretical material, the course explores the significance, and the aesthetics and politics, of different versions of modernist internationalism - exile, cosmopolitanism, colonialism, multilingualism, orientalism and exoticism. It also aims at understanding the emergence of modernism, the political contexts in which its practices could thrive, as well as its legacy.

Foundational Modules

Art and Aesthetics

FA106 Beginners Black and White Photography: Made for a Party

Module: Art Objects and Experience

Instructor: April Gertler

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

Using the backdrop of Berlin the Beginning Photo Class titled Made for a Party (*named after the Berlin artist and photographer Hannah Höch) will combine several elements simultaneously: exploring the history of photography by Berlin-based photographers, learning how to use a manual camera, and how to make analogue photographic prints in an analogue darkroom.  Participants will be exposed to the rich photographic history of Berlin through presentations, discussions and walks through the city focusing on famous Berlin based photographers. Students will undertake assignments through the semester that will enrich their understanding of analogue photography on as many levels as possible. Camera techniques and black and white printing will be the core substance of the class.

FA103 Found Fragments & Layered Lines: mixed-media techniques for drawing and collage

Module: Art Objects and Experience

Instructor: John Kleckner

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

This is a hands-on studio art course exploring contemporary and historical approaches to drawing and collage. The class projects are designed to exercise each student's skills in visual thinking through the creation of drawings on paper and collages of found printed fragments. Students will gather printed materials from Berlin's famous Flohmärkte (flea markets) to use in creating original collages; students will also draw dynamic object arrangements, make abstractions from nature by working outdoors, work collaboratively on large-scale drawings, develop their own systematic approach for generating compositions, and experiment with the expressive possibilities of combining text and imagery. A central focus will be examining the potential to create new and surprising meanings and contexts resulting from the juxtaposition and layering of image fragments together. The semester culminates in the creation of a body of original artwork that will be shown in a class exhibition. The majority of classes are studio sessions. There will also be a number of group critiques, image presentations, and several artist studio / gallery visits. The ideal student will be highly motivated, with a strong interest in studying and producing art, and must be comfortable with presenting their artistic creations with peers in class discussions.

FM206 Film Narratives-Introduction to Film Studies

Modules: Approaching Arts Through Theory/Theater and Film

Instructor: Matthias Hurst

The focus of this introductory course is on the analysis of structures and elements of story and discourse. Principles and general ideas of narratology will be explored in their application to film. Plot structure, characters, time, perspective, mise-en-scène and montage are the basic elements of a filmic narration. To read a film properly means to analyze these elements as meaningful aspects of discourse and put their significance in relation. Taking a look at historical, classical and contemporary films, arthouse productions and popular movies -- for example Citizen Kane (1941), Rashomon (1950), Shane (1953), Last Year at Marienbad (1961), A Zed & two Noughts (1985), Dogville (2003) and Star Wars:The Force Awakens (2016) -- we discuss the diachronic development of essential structures that create film narratives. Other works to be considered are: The Woman in the Window (1944, Fritz Lang), Rashomon (1950,  Akira Kurosawa), Shane (1953, George Stevens), American Graffiti (1973, George Lucas), and Magnolia (1999, Paul Thomas Anderson).

AH212 German Art and Identity

Module: Art and Artists in Context

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

Instructor: Aya Soika

The nineteenth century was the great age of "nationalism," or the belief that the ideal political configuration was the linguistically and culturally unified population formed into a state. Nationalism was in part a progressive movement, reacting to rule by aristocratic hierarchies, imperial control, or conquering foreign powers. It also developed reactionary components, relying on notions of race or of ethnic homogenity that were dangerously exclusionary or even annhilatory. Art has played a contradictory role in regard to nationalism, contributing to or appropriated by it to establish narratives of the history of a "people," yet also attacking such constructs by dismantling the tropes they exploit. The relation between art and nationalism is particularly complex in the German case because of the territorial intricacy of the lands in which vernacular German-speakers or those claiming some kind of German identity lived. It is also complicated by an historical antithesis between German culture and the styles of expression that were defined as most desirable for art and for civilized life. This course traces the relationship between German art and German identity from the period that is seen as the first manifestation of a specifically "German" proto-national identity, the Reformation, through the Romantic movement that arose in the period of Napoleonic occupation, up to the modern critiques (and violent enforcements) of a "national" aesthetic in the twentieth century. 

FA283 Research-Creation: New Approaches to the History of Forced Migration in Germany

Module: Art Objects and Experience 

Instructor: Marion Detjen, John von Bergen

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

This class is a continuation of the Fall seminar “History and Memory: Forced Migration in 20th and 21st Century Germany”. It combines artistic and conceptual approaches, taught jointly by John von Bergen and Marion Detjen. We will start with an introduction to contemporary art works based on forced migration history and memory, as well as other examples of artworks that may offer inspiration for project development . Then we will go through the concept and the experimental possibilities of “research-creation”, an approach that has been developed in social sciences and humanities to introduce creative processes and artistic practices as an integral part of research. The largest part of the class will be spent working on individual projects to visualize, melodize, spatialize or verbalize previously collected knowledge and experience, seeking to advance and enhance our knowledge with new, artistic means. The students should decide at the beginning of the class whether they wish to pursue “creation-as-research”, i.e. work on an artistic project themselves, or whether they prefer to do “research-from-creation”, i.e. analyze and interpret the works of their fellow students in their formation process. The medium of choice should be established as early as possible for logistical reasons. At the end we will, in collaboration with architecture students from the Academy of Fine Arts, Vienna, produce an exhibition to present our works and to put them forward for public discussion.

Economics

MA120 Mathematics for Economics

Module: Mathematics for Economics

Instructors: Israel WaichmanMartin Binder

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

This course focuses on the mathematical tools important for the study of economics: analytic geometry, functions of a single variable, functions of two variables, calculus, integrals and linear algebra (matrices, determinants, systems of linear equations and methods for solving them). A large part of the course will deal with optimization in one or more variables and its corresponding applications in economics (e.g. utility and profit maximization problems). The course will also be useful for any student with a general interest in mathematics, or who does not intend advanced specialization in economics, but wishes to become informed regarding the essential mathematical building blocks of economics as a discipline.

This course fulfills the mathematics and science requirement for humanities students

EC211 Macroeconomics

Module: Macroeconomics

Instructor: Beatrice Farkas

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

This course familiarizes students with the main models that macroeconomists use to analyze the way economies behave. The module begins by examining theories that seek to explain money and banking. We then focus our attention on investigating economic theories that explain short run business cycles, the periods of recession and boom that occur on a regular basis. An important part of the course is to investigate the role of governments in affecting the long and short-term economic prospects of their countries. We apply this theoretical knowledge to a range of current economic issues, including budget deficits and national debt, loans and private sector debt, the current account, and the role of institutions. 

MA151 Introduction to Statistics

Module: Statistics

Instructor: Bastian Becker

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

This course introduces students to quantitative research methods. These methods are fundamental to modern policy analyses and empirical social science research more generally. Knowledge of these methods is indispensable for anyone seeking to conduct, or to critically engage with, such analyses and research. The course covers the basics of descriptive and inferential statistics, with a focus on probability theory, hypothesis testing, and regression analysis. To facilitate students' ability to understand and critically engage with these methods, examples of quantitative social science research are discussed throughout the course. Classes are complemented with exercises to build students' skills in applying the learned methods independently. Many of these exercises use data from public opinion surveys, which cover a wide range of social, economic, and political topics. Working with this survey data, students will also have the opportunity to explore research questions of their own. At the end of the course, students will be able to read and engage with the majority of modern quantitative research. They also will be well prepared to pursue a variety of more advanced quantitative research courses.

This course fulfills the mathematics and science requirement for humanities students

Ethics and Politics

PL105 In Search of the Good: An Introduction to Ethics

Module: Ethics and Moral Philosophy

Instructor: Tracy Colony

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

What is the basis for ethical action? Since its beginnings, philosophy has confronted this question. In this course we will read some of the central texts in Western philosophy that have attempted to come to terms with it. Starting with Socrates and focusing on the works of Aristotle, Hume, Kant, Emerson, and Nietzsche we will trace a tradition which has sought to understand and elaborate the possible grounds and scope of ethical action. The approach of the course will be predominantly chronological and we will engage in close readings of these seminal texts with an eye to their historical context and reception. However, we will also approach their concepts and vocabularies as possible starting points or references for conceiving of and reflecting on our own ethical responses to our circumstances and wider historical situation.         

PT220 Theory of the State

Module: History of Political Thought

Instructor: Jan Völker

 Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

The state has been a major concern for philosophy from its beginnings: The question of the state can be considered the kernel and origin of political philosophy. Politics emerges with the problem of the organization of the community, the city-state, the polis. Already here, we find with Plato and Aristotle two very different accounts of the organization of individuals in the form of a community. The philosophy of the state has since opened new questions - questions of ethics, of power, of justice, idealism, pragmatism - but it has also pivoted around two central questions. The first of these is the question of the state as a separate mechanism of power. Does the power of the state secure and guarantee the rights of the individual, does it enable the ethical life of the individual as Hegel has it, or is it rather a coercive mechanism that needs to be overcome, as Marxism will later demand? A second issue concerns the legitimization of the state. How can modern states be legitimized if they cannot rely on preexisting- metaphysical or dynastic - authorities anymore? Is not every modern state a state of exception, and the people the sovereign who decides on the exception? The seminar will follow traces of these debates from antiquity to modernity, from the law to the exception. Readings will include Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Rousseau, Kant, Fichte, Hegel, Marx, Schmitt, Agamben. 

Literature and Rhetoric

LT251 Poetry and Poetics

Module: Poetry and Poetics

Instructor: James Harker     

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

This course will approach poetry from many angles. First, what does poetry do? And what makes poetic language distinct? As we look for answers to these questions, we will think about poetry's relationship to philosophy, rhetoric, prose, and everyday speech. Second, how do we analyze poetry? Throughout the course, we will learn to identify verse forms, meters, and figures and to speak with fluency using the technical language of prosody. The goal is more than that of learning a "technical" vocabulary; it is to learn to discover more in the poetry that we read. Finally, how has poetry changed over time? The course offers a survey of English-language poetry from the English Renaissance to the present day. We will be able to trace the rise and fall-and occasional return-of poetic forms as well as the influence that certain major figures and movements have exerted on succeeding poets. We will also each memorize a sonnet and even try writing in some of the poetic forms we study. All of these approaches are intended to make every phase in the history of poetry more alive, exciting, and relevant.

LT217 Detective Fiction

Module: Theories and Kinds of Narrative

Instructor: Laura Scuriatti

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

As he got older, the notoriously misanthropic English novelist Kingsley Amis insisted that he would not read anything that did not begin with the words "a shot rang out." What is it about the detective fiction form that exercises a grip on readers, even when all aesthetic interest or ornament has fallen away? This fundamentally compelling quality has allowed detective fiction to nestle at the heart of even the most intricate and complex literary performances (think of Shakespeare's Hamlet), or alternatively, to explore issues of identity and social codes that might be deemed unpalatable in more demanding guise. Most gloriously (and disturbingly) detective fiction can achieve a vertiginous purity of form, shaping itself around a void, as in Edgar Allan Poe's "The Purloined Letter." The figure of the detective him or herself has become a cultural icon: mysterious, alone, cerebral, aesthete. We will examine the basic components of the genre and its effectiveness, as well as the other kinds of investigation it makes possible beyond the discovery of agents of crime. Our journey encompasses anxieties surrounding massive urban growth in the Victorian era, and reaches the filmic and feminist rewritings of detective fiction tropes in the present. The course includes work by Arthur Conan Doyle, Daphne Du Maurier, Heimito von Doderer, Agatha Christie, Dorothy L. Sayers, Alfred Hitchcock, Fritz Lang, John Huston, Leonardo Sciascia, Patricia Cornwell; we will also reflect on these in dialogue with texts in philosophy, cultural history, psychoanalysis and narrative form.

Politics

PS114 States, Institutions, and Post-Conflict Societies: Introduction to Comparative Politics

Module: Comparative Politics

Coordinator: Elena Stavrevska

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

What constitutes a state and how are nations formed? What are the different systems in which political power can be organized? How do we account for the differences between democracies and autocracies and which institutional forms can they take? And why do some states provide better living conditions for their citizens and are better able to tackle contemporary challenges than others? These are some of the questions at the heart of the study of comparative politics. By the same token, they are also some of the most pressing questions faced by post-conflict societies in their efforts to organize political power anew. Drawing on examples and debates from peace and conflict literature, the course provides an introduction to key theoretical approaches and concepts in the comparative study of politics. The focus will be on core topics in political development, such as state- and nation-building, the role of the state, democratization, economic development, ethnic conflict, and political culture. We will also look at the different types of political regimes, electoral and party systems, the way they affect the structure, functioning, logic, and social role of political institutions, as well as the role of civil society. In exploring these topics from a comparative perspective, theoretical texts are combined with case studies primarily from different post-conflict societies. By the end of the course, students will be able to understand important topics in domestic politics, grasp the diversity of political systems and regimes, and analyze current political developments.

IN110 What is Globalization?

Module: International Studies and Globalization

Instructor: Boris Vormann

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S credits

In the social sciences, globalization is often defined as an increase in the mobility of various factors and actors. This definition includes heightened flows of finance capital, the rise of global production networks and new commodity circuits in expanding divisions of labor as well as the movement of people; whether they be business travelers, tourists, migrants or those seeking political asylum. This course examines how growing networks of exchange and circulation have altered political calculation, economic geographies, and governmental arrangements. A particular focus will be placed on the political processes that have facilitated and increased mobility over time, from the emergence of the interstate system in the late nineteenth century, to the "globalization of risk" in our own historical moment. By addressing these various phases we consider the way in which the phenomena and levels of globalization (affecting the market, labor, and urban space) challenge the traditional paradigms of the social sciences and prompt a new formulation of the fields of policy development and international relations. 

EC202 Public Policy Analysis from an Economic Perspective

Module: Policy Analysis

Instructor: Bastian Becker

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

Economic theory informs much of contemporary public policy analysis. This course introduces students to the main concepts and fundamental ideas underlying such analyses. While such analyses are not limited to specific policy areas, this course focuses on urban development and politics with the city of Berlin serving as its main case study.  The first half of the course encompasses an introduction of the economic perspective to analyzing societies, and in particular markets. We analyze situations in which markets fail, such as public goods provision, natural monopolies, and in the presence of externalities or information asymmetries. Governments can fill this void, but are not immune to failure either, such as in the case of bureaucratic inefficiencies and rent-seeking. The second half of the course focuses on the public policy tools available to address market and government failures, including regulation through laws, incentive setting through taxes, and institutions that serve as checks-and-balances. Such tools are not limited to governmental actors but are influenced by private actors, such as political entrepreneurs, interest groups, and non-governmental organizations. Finally, the import of public policy analysis in implementing these tools is elaborated, focusing on the identification of a problem, the mapping of relevant actors, and the assessment of costs and benefits of different policy options. Students finish the course with a good working knowledge of public policy analysis from an economic perspective, allowing them to maneuver its strengths as well as its weaknesses.

The following courses are cross-listed with Ethics and Politics

PL105 In Search of the Good: An Introduction to Ethics

Module: Political and Moral Thought 

Instructor: Tracy Colony

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

PT220 Theory of the State

Module: Political and Moral Thought

Instructor: Jan Völker

 Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

Advanced Modules

Art and Aesthetics

AR302 Art and Society II: What Exhibitions tell us about Society

Module: Aesthetics and Art Theory / Exhibition Culture and Public Space

Instructor: Dorothea von Hantelmann

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

Tate Modern's Turbine Hall in London tells us as much about the state of Western society in 2017 as the Crystal Palace reflected mid-19th century productivism, or as early modern curiosity cabinets connect to the rise of consumer culture. Art institutions are mirrors of the socio-economic order of their time, whose basic parameters they practice and enact. We can retrace the entire history of individualisation by following the increase of wall space between paintings in 19th- and 20th- century galleries. We can comprehend the transition of early market societies into consumer societies alongside the transformation of 19th-century museums into white cubes. And we can analyse the contemporary experience society on the basis of the way it transforms the white cube into time-based experiential spaces. Art institutions are deeply linked to the values and categories that constitute a given time, which is why they have to keep transforming in order to adjust and to remain what they always have been: a contemporary ritual. In this course, we will look at art spaces and curatorial concepts from the 16th century to the present day and discuss their relation to the socio-economic formation of their moment. With this theoretical knowledge in mind, there will be several visits to museums and exhibitions in Berlin, where we will examine how these topologies both cultivate and challenge fundamental categories and concepts of today's societies, like "citizen," "individual," "object" and "progress."

AH305 Raphael, Titian, and the Art of Painting

Module: Artists, Genres, Movements

Instructor: Geoff Lehman

Credits: 8 ECTS , 4 U.S. credits

This course examines the works of two painters central to the Renaissance tradition, Raphael and Titian, and considers the dialogues among them and the larger questions they raise for understanding the art of painting. For Vasari, Raphael's art was the epitome of Florentine disegno (design, drawing) and Titian's of Venetian colorito (coloring). And yet this is only one of a myriad of ways that these two artists, between them, defined the terms of Renaissance painting, and of its long afterlife in the following centuries. Their individual works are exceptional in the complexity of interpretation they demand, in their aesthetic and affective power, in their engagement with the wider humanist culture of the Renaissance, and in the degree to which all these qualities emerge from the use of the medium itself and from the very process of painting. Indeed, the works of these artists not only play a central role in defining the "art of painting" historically within the Western tradition; they also raise the question of the meaning and the power of the art itself, its philosophical (metaphysical, ontological, epistemological) character and its role in responding to and shaping human experience. The course will focus on a small number of major works (among others: Raphael's Madonnas, large altarpieces, and frescoed rooms in the Vatican; Titian's mythologies, portraits, and paintings in sitù in Venice) and will consider the response to Raphael and Titian in the works of the Mannerist generation and of later artists (Rubens, Poussin, Monet, Picasso). Visits to museums to encounter works of art firsthand will be an integral part of the course.

AH302 The Idea of the Aesthetic

Module: Aesthetics and Art Theory

Instructor: Katalin Makkai

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

 "Aesthetics" and "aesthetic" are terms that are often taken for granted inside as well as outside academic discourse. We speak of aesthetic experiences and judgments and qualities, and we employ "aesthetics" to designate the study of such matters. Although their root is taken from the Greek, the now-familiar terms (in their now-familiar usages) are, however, comparatively new. They are commonly regarded as having been introduced into the philosophical lexicon in the eighteenth century-a few hundred years ago. This course studies some of the texts that were key to the discovery, or perhaps the invention, of the "aesthetic". What work was the "aesthetic" meant to do? How did its evolution retain or reconfigure its original senses and purposes? Is the idea of the "aesthetic" problematic, ideological, or chimerical? Do we need an idea of the "aesthetic" to think about contemporary art? Do we need such an idea to think about nature and our relation to it? Authors addressed include Shaftesbury, Hutcheson, Hume, Kant, Schiller, Schopenhauer, Coleridge, Bell, Beardsley, Bullough, Stolnitz, Isenberg, Dickie, Greenberg, Carroll, Bernstein, Rancière.

FM307 Controversial Films

Module: Artists, Genres, Movements

Instructor: Matthias Hurst

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

Film history is punctuated by the advent of films that have caused controversy and even scandal, to the point of provoking condemnation and outright censorship. In this course, we will ask what makes a "controversial" film, and what such controversies tell us about the development of film aesthetics and social mores. It is a commonplace that modern art forms rejected the emphasis on beauty and harmony that were the key values of nineteenth-century aesthetics, and also that film itself depends to a large extent on provocation, on re-making the visual world anew or offering visual experiences unavailable to everyday perception. But what do specific instances of notoriety, or apparent flouting of visual and moral convention, suggest about cultural taboos and the state of film aesthetics? How does the shock generated by these artworks, or their conversion to cult status, change culture and film history? Among the films we will view and discuss are: The Birth of a Nation (1915, dir. David W. Griffith), L'Age d'Or (1930, dir. Luis Buñuel), Peeping Tom (1960, dir. Michael Powell), A Clockwork Orange (1971, dir. Stanley Kubrick), Last Tango in Paris (1972, dir. Bernardo Bertolucci), Salo or The 120 Days of Sodom (1975, dir. Pier Paolo Pasolini), The Last Temptation of Christ (1988, Martin Scorsese), Natural Born Killers (1994, dir. Oliver Stone), Baise-moi (2000, dir. Virginie Despentes), The Passion of the Christ (2003, dir. Mel Gibson), Antichrist (2009, dir. Lars von Trier).

FA305 Imagined Geographies-Redefining Nationhood through Artistic Practice

Module: Media, Practices, Techniques

Instructor: Heba Amin

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

This hybrid studio/seminar course examines the wide range of artistic projects that propose new political imaginings of political geographies. Artists have founded micronations, proposed to colonize outer space, even attempted to drain the Mediterranean Sea. The class will examine the role that technology has played in altering our relation to landscape, and how it can be used as a tool to rethink and reconfigure the global frameworks of nationhood. Through creative projects, readings, class exercises and field visits, we will explore alternative possibilities of belonging in the era of digitization.  The class will reframe conventional parameters of citizenry within the construct of borders and migration. Can critical geography be used as a method to find alternative ways of organizing current political constructs? We will explore "imagined geographies" as an opportunity to rethink these political configurations and pose the question: what comes after the nation? 

FM315 Developing Characters in Video Art: Alter Egos, Doppelgangers and Bootlegs

Module: Media, Practices, Techniques

Instructor: Dafna Maimon

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

In this advanced video art class, students will work with character development as the basis for creating both narrative and non-narrative fictional video works. Character development in this case may extend from creating personified beings, to considering the city or another backdrop as a character. We will explore three different perspectives in developing one character over the entire semester; the alter ego - an alternative constructed personality, the doppelganger - an existing double,  or the bootleg - an unofficial duplicate. These three "frames" allow us to fictionalize narratives from our own lives, but also to explore multiple techniques and entry points for investigating this one character. These entry points all challenge and examine the idea of the original and the real, a subject matter artists and filmmakers inevitably explore when aiming to create believable or effective fiction. We will study works from video artists, who have themselves created alter egos, as well as visit the studios of Berlin artists who focus on related subject matter. In order to explore these variations, and to reach deep into our creative subconsciousness, we will make use of embodiment techniques, role-play, performative improvisation exercises, script writing as well as "speed drawing." The class focus will be on the making of video work, putting the artist's process and experimentation in the foreground. In this approach, an end result will be considered only a momentary pause within a longer trajectory; each work can be seen as an episode or variation in an ongoing series.

FA207 Advanced Photography: Alternative Processes

Module: Media, Practices, Techniques

Instructor: April Gertler

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

This is an intermediate level photography class dedicated to alternative modes of image making and image alteration. The class will explore a variety of image-making techniques including large scale prints (1 meter prints!), cyanotypes, pinhole cameras and exploring the use of liquid light. The class will be rigorous and demand a considerable amount of out of class studio time to complete the assignments. The class will also be geared to working in teams to complete various assignments. It is required that the student have a working knowledge of the darkroom and a basic understanding of how to make a black and white photographic print. A prerequisite is the Bard College Berlin course FA106: Beginning Photography, or a comparable course. If the student hasn't taken FA106 or similar, they should contact April Gertler and submit samples of their analogue work for review.  Please contact her also if you need further information about the course or about submitting work for consideration. 

FA303 Cornerstones of Your Practice: Collaboration, Curation, Socialization and Presentation

Module: Media, Practices, Techniques

Instructor: David C. Terry

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

This course will strengthen the participants' artistic practice through four principles: Collaboration, Curation, Socialization and Presentation. Participants in the course draw on the professional experience of artist, curator, and cultural producer David C. Terry, whose role as Director for the New York Foundation for the Arts has allowed him to work with hundreds of artists, administrators, curators, collectors and consultants in every aspect of artistic and creative practice. This course taps into his cornerstone concepts to identify, confront and work through personal and creative challenges. Collaboration: Participants will work on a collaborative project outside of their comfort zone. Curation: Participants will learn the curatorial practice and create and present an experience or exhibition. Socialization: Participants will develop and execute a socially engaged community project. Presentation: Participants will develop their voice to present their work, the work of others, and their artistic concepts in a universal format. Cornerstones of Your Practice is a living handbook on the foundation for presenting, understanding and sharing your creative vision and the creative vision of your contemporaries. 

TH310 Bertolt Brecht: The Study and Staging of Epic Theater

Module: Media, Practices, Techniques

Cross-listed with Literature and Rhetoric

Instructor: Julia Hart

Credits: 8 ECTS , 4 U.S. credits

Nowhere else can Bertolt Brecht's presence be felt more than in the streets of Berlin. But what really is the Epic Theater he is so famous for and what influence does it have on stage in Berlin's current theater scene? This course will not study the plays of Brecht as literature, but students will be in dialogue with Brecht as one of the most revolutionary theatermakers of the 20th Century.  This seminar will introduce students to Brecht's theoretical texts on the epic theater such as A Short Organum for the Theater  and The Street Scene. Students will not only analyze these provocative theater techniques, but will learn to use Brecht's specific acting and directing exercises and devices in rehearsal.  Throughout the semester, students will act and direct scenes from two of Brecht's classic epic works: Mother Courage and Her Children and The Good Person of Szechuan to investigate how Brecht and his ensemble worked.  This course includes visits to several theater productions in Berlin to question Brecht's footprint on German theater today.

Economics

EC311 Ethics and Economics

Module: Ethics and Economic Analysis

Instructor: Martin Binder

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

This course aims at highlighting how economics and ethics intersect in various ways: Is it legitimate to dump our trash in lesser-developed countries because it is, economically speaking, "efficient"? Are high salaries for managers or movie stars justified? Should a company be allowed to bribe officials in foreign countries in order to do business there? Should we encourage markets for organs or blood if they are efficiently allocating "resources"? In this course, seminars deal with these aspects of the economy, where different value judgments may be in conflict. While it is often useful to analyze various aspects of human life in economic terms, there may be spheres where economic calculation might seriously distort our judgments of goodness and rightness and hence might be in need of correction by other forms of measurement. The course balances the positive aspects of economics (such as alleviation of poverty and development of nations) with its negative sides (such as corruption of values and neglect of fairness issues). It elaborates on the value judgments underlying economics (its often utilitarian or libertarian commitments), and the difference between market logic and market ideology. 

EC212 Experimental Economics

Module: Choice, Resources and Development

Instructor: Israel Waichman

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

Experimental economics is the application of experimental methods to the study of economic questions. Especially, experimental economics allows for the controlled study of markets, environments, and the behavior of participants. The course aims at introducing experimental economics and its various applications. Our inquiry consists of two parts. In the first part, "the methodology of experimental economics," we introduce experimental economics. We discuss the merits (and limits) of experiments, and the principles of conducting and analyzing an experiment. In the second part, "Applications: Influential experiments in economics," we survey some of the seminal research in experimental (and behavioral) economics (e.g. market experiments, bargaining experiments, biases and heuristics under uncertainty, field experiments, social dilemma experiments, etc.). During the course we will conduct some experiments in the classroom, providing the course participants with first-hand experience of the economic situations that are being described.

Prerequisite: The course is non-technical and students from all disciplines are encouraged to participate. However, students taking this class must have successfully completed the course Principles of Economics. 

EC312 Cost Benefit Analysis

Module: Choice, Resources, and Development

Instructor: Israel Waichman

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

Did you ever ask yourself how economists make practical use of their studies in making real-life decisions? Or more precisely, how microeconomics is related to actual business and government decisions? This course deals with an important application of economic theory to real-life decision making. Cost-benefit Analysis (CBA) is a practical tool used by governments, regulatory bodies and other agencies as an aid to making public policy decisions. More precisely, CBA is a policy assessment method that quantifies the value of policy in monetary terms to all members of society. It is related to financial analysis or capital budgeting as done by private firms, but is distinct in that the goal is not to maximize profits but rather to seek the most beneficial course of action from a larger social perspective. Cost-benefit analysis is a legal prerequisite in several countries, including the U.S.A., U.K., Canada and Australia, before decisions are taken on projects related to the environment, health, transportation, etc. For instance, the question of whether or not to ban smoking in public places, or whether to build a new terminal in Heathrow airport. The goal of this course is to introduce students to cost-benefit analysis. We first study the microeconomic foundations of CBA. Then, we study particular issues in CBA (such as identification of costs and benefits, discounting, dealing with uncertainty, valuing intangibles, shadow prices, etc.).

Prerequisite: Students taking this class should have already have successfully completed the classes Mathematics for Economics, Principles of Economics, and Microeconomics.

EC310 Global Economics

Module: Global Economic Systems

Instructor: Beatrice Farkas

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

This course provides an overview of international economics in today's interconnected world.  International economics is split neatly into two parts: international trade and international finance. This division essentially coincides with the distinction between the microeconomics and macroeconomics of the open economy.

The first part examines theories of international trade and analyzes the consequences of trade policies. We analyze why countries trade, what they trade, who gains (or loses) from trade, and the effects of trade policies. The second part includes topics in international finance and examines the macroeconomics of open economies. We look into exchange rate determination and monetary policy-making under different exchange rate regimes. The discussions will focus on macroeconomic policies in open economies and currency crises.

Prerequisite: Students taking this class should have already have successfully completed the classes  Principles of Economics, Microeconomics, and Macroeconomics.

Ethics and Politics

The following courses are cross-listed with Politics

PT328 Popular Sovereignty in History, Theory, and Practice

Modules: Social Theory/Law and Society

Instructor: Ewa Atanassow

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

Premised on a certain vision of humanity and statehood, and on ideas about citizenship and belonging, popular sovereignty has become the paradigmatic way of legitimizing political authority. It has also been the subject of long theoretical and historical reflection, and its status underpins a great deal of empirical and institutional analysis. Drawing on different modes of investigation, this course would study the character and history of popular sovereignty, and the variety of institutional forms it can take. It would ask: What are the origins of popular sovereignty? How and why did it become the dominant means of legitimating political power? How does it work in practice? Focusing on the relationship between popular sovereignty and political representation, it would explore similarities and differences across countries and periods. Working comparatively, the course would also aim to bring together the resources of various scholarly disciplines- philosophy, political history, history of ideas, institutional analysis, and empirical research-to conduct a theoretically nuanced and empirically informed inquiry. It would train students to conjoin rigorous and creative interrogation of ideas with consideration of historical material and data analysis, as well as to engage in empirical research.

SO282 Migration, Gender, and the City

Module/s: Social Theory/Movements and Thinkers

Instructor: Agata Lisiak

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

Drawing from feminist, intersectional, and queer interventions into the fields of migration studies and urban studies, this class will explore the manifold intersections of migration, gender, and the urban. The course will be divided into four overlapping sections: theories, discourses, encounters, and infrastructures. We will carefully explore theories from the fields of human and feminist geography, urban studies, intersectional studies, and queer studies. Equipped with these theories, we will be looking into the workings of gender and migration in urban contexts. During workshops and presentations on discourse analysis, we will critically engage with the notions of homonationalism, femonationalism, racism, Islamophobia, stigma(tization), as well as relations between white feminism and nationalism. Next, we will discuss various gendered and ethnicized encounters in urban space and practice feminist psychogeography in order to explore sensory, embodied experiences of the urban. In the final weeks of the course, we will look into migrant infrastructures that shape encounters with diversity in cities. Students' final assignment will be a visual essay or collage addressing the notion of urban diversity in relation to gender and sexuality. Students taking this class will critically engage with scholarly articles and book chapters, as well as films, theater, fiction, and poetry. We will go on off-campus trips and invite migration scholars and activists to campus. 

HI308 Health, Medicine and Society in Early Modern Europe

Module/s: Movements and Thinkers/ Historical Studies

Instructors: Elaine Leong

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

What did early modern European men and women do when they got sick? That is, if they caught a cold, or broke a leg or if mysterious spots suddenly appeared on their body? This course is an exploration into the world of bodily health, sickness and medical care in early modern Europe. Topics covered include an assessment of the general living conditions in early modern cities; contemporary theories of the body, health and sickness; medical encounters; economies of health and medicine; cures, drugs and pharmacy; food, exercise and regimen; communications of medical knowledge; ideas about reproduction and experiences of childbirth; disease and ill health (incl. plague, syphilis and small pox) and gender and medicine.  Students will conduct close analytical readings of a selection of secondary sources, as well as examine a range of primary sources including pre-modern recipe books and medical texts.  Attention will be drawn to the different interdisciplinary approaches and methods used in the study of the body and health in the early modern period. Students will participate as transcribers and contributors in two international citizen humanities projects: Early Modern Recipes Online and Vernacular Medical Books in Early Modern England. Finally, time allowing, we will try our hand at making one or two simple early modern medical remedies.

This course fulfills the mathematics and science requirement for humanities students

HI284 Advanced Migration Studies

Module: Historical Studies

Instructor: Marion Detjen

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

PS381 Crisis Governance in the European Union

Modules: Law and Society

 Instructor: Elena Stavrevska

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

Often praised as the most successful peace endeavor in modern times, the European integration project that started in the aftermath of World War II has catalyzed unprecedented widening and deepening of cooperation among sovereign states. In recent years, however, not only has the pace of integration slowed down, but the EU has also been faced with multiple internal and external challenges, including Brexit, the rise of populism, the refugee crisis, migration crisis, enlargement fatigue, terrorist threats, and conflicts in its immediate neighborhood. This course examines the origins and evolution of the EU, the different theoretical approaches to understanding European integration, the functioning of the EU as a sui generis system of governance, the main political institutions and decision-making bodies within the Union, and some of its key policies and related challenges. Particular attention will be paid to EU's foreign, security, enlargement, and neighborhood policies. Put in the context of broader theoretical debates regarding the EU, each topic will be analyzed through specific empirical case studies and current developments. Additionally, students will have an opportunity to get better acquainted with EU's policy- and decision-making dynamics through a series of simulation exercises. By the end of the course, students with have foundational knowledge and skills needed for a comprehensive analysis and understanding of the politics and challenges of the EU.

Literature and Rhetoric

LT319 Postwar Experimental Narrative

Module: Literary Movements and Forms

Instructor: James Harker

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

This course surveys formally innovative narratives of the postwar period-novels, short stories, and transmedial narratives-- as well as literary theory that attempts to understand these experimental practices. We will consider fundamental features of narrative as well innovations that challenge those features: standard first- or third-person narration and "you" or "we" narration; the classic story/discourse distinction and metafiction; storyworlds and transmedial narration; chronology and radical experiments in reverse chronology or atemporality; mimesis and expressly anti-mimetic narratives. As we develop a capacity to recognize these formal innovations, we will think about the purposes for which they are put to use and how they contribute to "postmodernism," post-colonialism, and contemporary interests in identity. We will read narratives from Samuel Beckett, Alain Robbe-Grillet, Muriel Spark, John Barth, Ngugi wa Thiong'o, Theresa Hak Kyung Cha, Ian McEwan, Jeanette Winterson, Lydia Davis, Colson Whitehead, and Samantha Gorman and Danny Cannizzaro, as well as others. Theorists will include Roland Barthes, Michel Foucault, Monika Fludernik, Brian Richardson, Marie-Laure Ryan, Richard Walsh, Jan Alber, and others.

LT212 Reading into Writing: A Fiction Workshop

Module: Literary Analysis and Cultural Production

Instructor: Tom Drury

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

LT320 European Romanticism: The Spirit of an Age in Literature

Module: Literary Movements and Forms

Instructor: Jeffrey Champlin

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

This course studies key authors of German and English Romanticism who wrestle with the legacy of the French Revolution through literary renewal. Best known for its flights of imagination, the Romantic movement also envisions new modes of knowing and living together. Authors such as Percy Bysshe Shelley and Hegel envision a bold expansion of Enlightenment promises. Yet the Terror and Napoleonic Wars also violently tested such aspirations. In this context, Wordsworth and the Grimm Brothers take a more concrete path, going to the people for new literary impulses. The formal innovation of writing of the time expresses this rich clash of universal and particular in poetry, aphorisms, fairy tales, essays, and novels. We'll place particular emphasis on authors who lived in Berlin, including Fichte, Hegel, Kleist, Hoffmann, Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm, and the nearby Schlegel brothers (in Jena). English authors include Wordsworth, Coleridge, Percy and Mary Shelley.

GM362 The German Public Sphere

Module: Literary Analysis and Cultural Production

Instructor: Ulrike Wagner

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

What are the sources, networks and voices (prominent and minor) that shape the discourses of the German public sphere? This course supports the development of speaking and writing skills in German beyond C1 level through a study of national, regional, and alternative forums for debate. We look at the main figures and institutions that have an influence on the content, tone and direction of argument. Our discussion will be guided by the prevalent issues of concern that have emerged with great urgency in recent times and their current treatment: most notably, the "refugee crisis," the future of Europe, and Germany's role in the world, past and present. In addition to language study the purpose of the course will be to navigate the wide range of platforms for news, comment, and discussion in Germany, and to find what participants in the seminar judge to be reliable and enriching contributions to and interventions in public life. Among the issues we will consider is the question of access to public debate (the issue of diversity of identity, origin, belief, and modes of expression), as well as the part played by new outlets (social media) that have come to complicate the question of reliability and propriety in the public sphere.

LT304 Race and the Black Radical Tradition in Contemporary Literature and Art: A Comparative Perspective

Module: Author and Influence / Literary Movements and Forms

Instructor: Kathy-Ann Tan

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

In this class, we will trace the trajectory of the "Black radical tradition" (Cedric Robinson, 1983, Fred Moten, 2003) in literature and art - from its early beginnings in Black Reconstruction and W.E.B. Du Bois' 1903 essay, "The Souls of Black Folk", via the New Negro/Harlem Renaissance and Black Arts movements of the 1920s and 1960s respectively, to its contemporary manifestations in work inspired by the Black Lives Matter movement. We will acknowledge the transatlantic dimension of the Black radical tradition by exploring the writings of Black German scholars such as Maisha Eggers, Peggy Piesche, Fatima El-Tayeb, Sharon Dodua-Otoo and May Ayim, as well as Audre Lorde, a central figure whose work was highly influential on both sides of the Atlantic. Our readings will also include work on Afrofuturism, a visual, literary and musical aesthetic that combines elements of science-fiction, fantasy and post-humanism with Black history and culture. Finally, we will examine how the Black radical tradition is significant not only as a literary or aesthetic movement, but also as a body of critical thought that seeks to bring about a restructuring of political, economic, and social relations.

TH310 Bertolt Brecht: The Study and Staging of Epic Theater

Module: Author and Influence

Cross-listed with Art and Aesthetics

Instructor: Julia Hart

Credits: 8 ECTS , 4 U.S. credits

Politics

PS374 Comparative Public Policy

Module: Public Policy

Instructor: Boris Vormann

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

This class addresses key public policy fields through a comparative lens. A first part is dedicated to the means and ends of public policy. We explore typologies of comparative welfare state research and the Varieties of Capitalism (VoC) literature as a basis for our subsequent discussion of major shifts in state-market relations and their more general impacts on policy regimes. In this section we also develop an understanding of the processes and institutional mechanisms by which experts and interest groups can have an impact on policy. This, in turn, requires a familiarity with the methods and tools used to develop policy proposals, which will provide students with a potential starting point for the crafting of their independent projects. The second part of the course shifts gears and zooms in on a series of specific policy fields. One important aspect will be the question of who finances a given public good-and who benefits from particular arrangements between the private and the public sector. As such, the different policy fields will serve as ways to address questions of distributional justice, inequalities and the mechanisms that reproduce them. We will distinguish between national fields of public policy (i.e., health care, criminal justice, urban and regional policy), international fields (i.e., infrastructure, research and development, education), and transnational fields (energy, security, environmental sustainability). Overall, these field analyses will enable us to critically rethink the role of the state in globalization processes as well as the uneven development within and between national political systems and regional economic clusters. 

PT375 Nationalism

Module: Advanced Topics in Global and Comparative Politics

Instructor: Michael Weinman

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S.

In this course, we will investigate the ideological and material conditions under which individuals and groups contest for political goods through the construction of and resistance to state infrastructures and national identities. In so doing, we will keep close to the conviction that "theory follows practice"; meaning: we shall "discipline" our theoretical discussion by constant reference back to the actual practice of nationalism. This means that our reading of (often critical) theoretical analyses of nationalism, such as those offered by Anderson, Arendt, Gellner, and Brubaker, will be constantly referred back to close descriptive readings of particular national movements that cross both historical eras and geographical boundaries, from the emergence of nation-states in Europe to the (post-)colonial struggles for self-determination and national independence in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Through this interplay of theoretical and empirical study, we shall try to encompass something of the breadth and depth of the impact that nationalist movements and their institutionalization in state form have had throughout both the ("long") 19th century and the ("short") 20th century. In this way, perhaps, we will learn something about the future valences of nationalism, widely considered to be flourishing as the liberal international order faces an ongoing crisis of legitimacy.

PS385 Statecraft in the New Global Order

Module: Advanced Topics in Global and Comparative Politics

Instructor: Boris Vormann

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

In this course, we explore forms of political cooperation and conflict in the context of changing institutional regimes. We are particularly interested in how processes of globalization, regionalization and urbanization alter existing commitments between states, reshape alliances between governmental and private actors, and lead to the consolidation of new power blocks. This inquiry implies both an analysis of emergent political forms at scales other than the national as well as a consideration of historical path dependencies, cultural ties, and regional specificities. The course's main body is organized around three main axes. First, we examine persistent statehood at the national level: How have existing inter-state arrangements been altered over time to adapt to changing political and economic realities? What roles do states still play in global politics today? This first set of questions implies a reassessment of traditional conceptual tools and reference points (e.g. the nation-state, the global North-South divide). Second, we trace how the relativization of scales since the 1970s has given rise to a variety of new political actors and has led to the formation of new interest coalitions. We begin by turning to regional political realignments both on the subnational (Québec, Catalonia, Scotland etc.) as well as on the supranational (NAFTA, EU, AU, etc.) level. We will focus on the political and economic viability of these regional formations and ask which degree of independence they actually have from national states. Several case studies will help us bring into focus the nuts and bolts of changing alliances on this level in some of the key strategic policy fields. Finally, we turn to the local scale and to the rise of global and mega cities as they compete for resources and cooperate in consolidating transnational city networks. We will conclude this course with different case studies (e.g. the C40 city network) to assess the potentials and limitations for cooperation on that level, which has come to reflect the hopes for a more sustainable planetary development in today's so-called "urban era." 

SE220 Social Justice and Urban Spaces

Module: Social Commitment and the Public Sphere

Instructor: Cassandra Ellerbe-Dück

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

Urban spaces have often served as the backdrop for social justice movements and politicized organizing. Racial and ethnic tensions, gender and socioeconomic inequality, forced or voluntary migration etc. are undoubtedly issues that have been at the forefront of many emancipatory movements. However, these issues also play a significant role in how urban space(s) are structured and experienced, and utilised in the struggle for socio-political justice and transformation. In this course we will explore in depth the significance of social justice and politicized mobilization, and how these issues involved in both of these phenomena have taken shape within urban space(s) across the globe. Utilizing an interdisciplinary theoretical perspective (social justice theory, human geography, post-colonial and intersectional theory), we will analyse various historical as well as current contexts that show socio-politically informed social justice movements of marginalized groups in a variety of urban spaces. This course aims not only to discuss the purpose of and necessity for social justice and political activism, but also to assist students in the development of critical thinking of a contextualized understanding of a variety of urban-related social problems. The course entails lectures, in class discussions and presentations, off-campus visits to various Berlin based organisations, as well as guest lectures by local experts & scholars.

PT358 Critical Human Rights and Humanitarian Advocacy/ Scholars At Risk

Module: Social Commitment and the Public Sphere

Instructor: Kerry Bystrom

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

Scholars, students, and other researchers around the world are routinely threatened, jailed, or punished. Sometime they are simply trapped in a dangerous place, while in other cases they are deliberately targeted because of their identity or their work. Academic freedom, or freedom of thought and inquiry, is usually considered a basic human right, but its definition and content is essentially contested. This seminar will explore the idea of academic freedom by examining - and attempting to intervene in - situations where it is threatened. In conjunction with the human rights organization Scholars at Risk, we will investigate the cases of scholars currently living under threat and develop projects aimed at releasing them from detention or securing refuge for them. This will involve direct hands-on advocacy work with SAR, taking public positions and creating smart and effective advocacy campaigns for specific endangered students, teachers, and researchers. In order not to do this naively or uncritically, our action-oriented work will be paired throughout the semester with critical reflection on human rights and humanitarian advocacy more generally. Through readings about the historical rise of human rights and humanitarianism as paradigms for creating a better world--as well as the pitfalls of these paradigms--and by engaging with texts that outline the ethical and practical challenges of doing advocacy, we will together work towards creating an intellectual framework that allows us to be more attentive, deliberate and effective advocates for social change.

The following courses are  cross-listed with Ethics and Politics

PS381 The European Union and its Challenges

Modules: Advanced Topics in Global and Comparative Politics

 Instructor: Elena Stavrevska

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

SO282 Migration, Gender, and the City

Module: Social Commitment and the Public Sphere

Instructor: Agata Lisiak

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

HI308 Health, Medicine and Society in Early Modern Europe

Module/s: Philosophy and Society

Instructors: Elaine Leong

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

Electives

IS331 Berlin Internship Seminar: Working Cultures, Urban Cultures

Instructor: Agata Lisiak

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits (in combination with an internship)

The Berlin Internship Seminar accompanies students' undertaking of an internship or period of practical training, and addresses such issues as: the successful functioning of institutions, the role of guiding principles and values in determining the direction and structure of projects and initiatives, and the relationship between the various spheres of society (the EU, the state, the market, and the individual) in influencing the way institutions operate. Over the course of the seminar we will also talk about contemporary ways of living and working in Berlin and beyond: How is work organized temporally and spatially and how does it, in turn, affect the city and its residents? What distinguishes the spaces in which we live and work today? Which new forms of work have emerged in Berlin recently? Which of them seem to thrive? How do Berlin's political, artistic, and citizen-activist organizations operate? What can we learn from these institutions? 

EL202 ESL Writing Intensive Seminar

Instructor: Ariane Simard

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

This course is designed to develop the writing skills of non-native English speakers to prepare for academic work in American Standard English (ASE).  Over the semester, students will review grammar, learn how to cite academic sources, as well as develop an effective and original academic writing voice.  We will put into practice essential writing techniques such as drafting, research, critical reading skills, re-writing and workshop.  Students will be graded on three short essays (2-3 pp) and one in-class essay.  Upon successful completion of the class, students should be able to think critically, as well as construct compelling narratives and effective written academic arguments.  In addition to some poems, short stories, and non-fiction, we will explore Berlin to help us examine ideas about identity in a rapidly changing city.

Language Courses

GM101 German Beginner A1 (Group A)

GM101 German Beginner A1 (Group B)

GM151 German Beginner A2 (Group A)

GM151 German Beginner A2 (Group B)

GM151 German Beginner A2 (Group C)

GM201 German Intermediate B1 (Group A)

GM201 German Intermediate B1 (Group B)

GM251 German Intermediate B2

GM301 German Advanced C1

GM362 The German Public Sphere(In German)

Beginner German A1
Emphasis on familiar vocabulary building, listening comprehension and speaking with gradual introduction to grammar and writing skills. 

Beginner German A2
Continued emphasis on listening comprehension and routine communication. Students read and write short, simple texts. 

Intermediate German B1 
Emphasis on communication skills including comprehension of standard speech and descriptive reading passages, topical conversation and simple, descriptive composition. 

Intermediate German B2 
Continued emphasis on communication skills including comprehension of extended speeches and lectures, reading of newspapers and general periodicals, spontaneous conversational interaction with native speakers and writing clear, detailed text on a wide range of subjects. 

Advanced German Language C1
Development of listening and reading comprehension levels to include extended speech and some literary texts. Emphasis on conversational and writing skills to express ideas and opinions and present detailed descriptions expressing points of view. 

Advanced German Language C2 
Development of comprehension skills to allow for understanding of all forms of spoken language and written texts. Emphasis on communication skills for the fluent expression of ideas and argument both orally and in written form.

Bard College Berlin typically offers students three levels of language instruction, beginning, intermediate and advanced. Placement tests determine each student's enrollment level.