Core Courses

IS104 Medieval Literature and Culture: Forms of Love

AY/BA1/Bard1 Core Course

Coordinator: Marcela Perett

Course times: Tue 9:00 - 12:15, Thur 10:45 - 12:15 & 13:30 - 15:00

Credits: 14 ECTS, 8 U.S. credits

The first year spring semester core course is devoted to an exploration of the category of love in medieval European Christianity. The study of the distinctive manifestations of the concept and its accompanying social rituals offers a primary guide to the achievements of the medieval civilizations (between 400 and 1500 C.E.), as its encompassing and differentiation was often their highest intellectual value and aim. Taking our departure from the fundamental forms of love (eros) posited in antiquity by Plato in the Symposium, we examine the medieval revision of these terms in a range of different contexts (e.g., the monastery, the court, the city) and genres (e.g., romance, lyrical poetry) both sacred and secular. Principally, the course investigates how the arrival of Christianity as a state-sponsored religion in most of Europe revitalized and transformed the Greek understanding of love into new categories (such as agape, the love with which God allegedly loved his creation, and amour courtois, the romantic love between members of the nobility), which ranged from the metaphysical and the erotic, to social and institutional designations. Secondly, the course will examine the interactions between different ideas and traditions with respect to the category of love, and show how its formulation reflects their wider convictions and norms. Emphasizing the heritage and origins of the texts which articulated these debates, we will also attend to the fact that the works of Greek Antiquity were only available to medieval writers in translation, and to the ways in which authors borrowed from or reiterated one another’s assumptions and frameworks. Finally, the course addresses the transformation of genre that reflection on the concept of love effected; the connections between religious belief and an array of other cultural productions and practices.

Syllabus

 

IS212 History and Philosophy of Science: Early Modern Science

BA2 Core Course

Coordinator: Michael Weinman

Course times: Tue 9:30 - 12:45, Thur 11:00 - 12:30 & 13:30 - 15:00

Credits: 14 ECTS, 8 U.S. credits

The course seeks to introduce the scientific advances of the early modern period (with particular focus on the seventeenth century): the developments that defined the principles, methods and frameworks of modern natural science as it exists today.  We not only explore the philosophical basis and conclusions of this historical development, but its experimental procedures, and come to an understanding of their practical form and the meaning of their results. In the first section, we concentrate on the new understanding of space, matter and motion deriving from the cosmologies and mechanical theories of this era (the basis of modern physics). In the second, we consider the remarkable advances in the life sciences at this period (examining anatomical and medical texts), and finally, attend to the emergence of what came to be called “chemistry” out of the mystical practice of alchemy. Spread throughout the course are visits to exhibitions and collections in Berlin, which will help us to reflect on the way in which scientific practices and their discoveries have been historicized, and why we ought to enhance our critical awareness of such historicizing.

Syllabus

 

IS311 Berlin: Experiment in Modernity

Bard in Berlin Core Course

Instructor: Florian Becker

Course times: Mon 17:00 - 18:30, Wed 15:15 - 16:45, Fri (Museum visit - off campus) 15:15 - 19:00

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

More than any other city, Berlin has been a source and a theater for the forces shaping Western modernity. Its importance and its by turns glorious and catastrophic role in European culture and history have their origins in its peculiar development. Built on a swamp, in a poor duchy surrounded by more powerful states, it was remade during the Enlightenment as a center not only of military discipline and administrative control but also of learning and innovation. Increasingly characterized in the later nineteenth century by almost uncontrolled growth, it rose to the status of capital of the German Empire and became a center of science and technology. With rapid industrialization came sharp social polarization and bitter political conflict, but also the birth of aesthetic modernism and avantgarde culture. After the clamor for imperial power and colonial expansion culminated in the cataclysm of World War I, Berlin witnessed the unprecedented artistic rebirth of the Weimar Republic. During the Nazi dictatorship the city became the point of origin of political terror, war and genocide. Reduced to little more than “a pile of rubble near Potsdam” (Bertolt Brecht), Berlin found itself on the frontline of the Cold War and remained forcibly divided for more than four decades between two radically different political and economic systems. Through a combination of historical sources, literature, philosophy, and a wide range of artifacts—from paintings to photographs to film, archival and contemporary—we shall seek to understand Berlin’s significance and its current position at the heart of Europe. And we will speculate about its possible futures as a place of gathering and experiment for a population from across the world.

Syllabus

 

IS322 Modernism: Time

BA3-4/PY Core Course

Coordinator: Laura Scuriatti

Course times: Tue 9:30 - 12:45, Thur 11:00 - 12:30 & 13:30 - 15:00

Credits: 14 ECTS, 8 U.S. credits

At the turn into the twentieth century, a new movement arose, now primarily identified with literary and aesthetic practices, but which can be said to reach across all the most important developments in the arts and sciences. The category of "time" was central to modernist experiment, whether in defining a change in the way human consciousness was conceived and represented, in the relationship between the present and the past, and the dynamics of historical transformation itself. “Newness” itself was a fundamental value of modernism, guiding the programs of artistic practice and an embrace of the microcosmically complex and the unpredictable in scientific procedure.  This core course draws upon one of the monumental works of modernist literature, Robert Musil’s The Man Without Qualities, written between 1930 and 1942, to explore the key developments in modernist epistemology and their connection to philosophical accounts of temporality. We investigate the relationship between modernism and modernity; the emergent accounts of the functioning of human consciousness (in psychoanalysis, the discipline of psychology, analytic and continental philosophy); the meaning of modernism in music and the arts, and the specific characteristics of modernist narrative. Musil’s novel accompanies the readings and topics throughout, providing a record of the main intellectual developments in its time (from politics to criminology) and embodying some of the defining features of the modernist novel: a protagonist adjacent to conventional social identity; a narrative logic which follows the associations of the mind; an open-ended structure which negates the frameworks of form; a reflection on the high-bourgeois European culture that was destroyed by the First World War.  We end with a reflection on the legacy of modernism today, and its implications for the experience and representation of everyday life and the definition of the objects and aims of art, philosophy and science.

Syllabus

 

Concentration Seminars

PT238 Equality

Ethics and Politics Concentration Seminar

Instructor: Ewa Atanassow

Course times: Wed 10:45 - 12:15, Fri 16:00 - 17:30

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

What are the origins of the egalitarian ideal? What does equality actually mean? Is it possible and desirable to realize it in practice? Alongside freedom, equality is among the central categories of ethical and political thought. It is said to be the defining ideal of modern society. Complementing the first Ethics and Politics concentration seminar, this course will be dedicated to a sustained examination of the meanings and value of equality. Our investigation will proceed in two parts: we begin by probing the historical wellsprings of equality through an engagement with some of its most influential ancient, Christian and modern articulations. Against this historical and conceptual background, in part two we’ll reflect on the experience and competing interpretations of equality that inform the institutions and practices of democratic society. Taking as our guide Tocqueville’s comprehensive analysis of the American polity, and considering more recent case studies, we’ll pose questions about the effects and preconditions of actualizing the egalitarian ideal, and its status in liberal democracy.

Syllabus

 

AR231 Representation

Art and Aesthetics Concentration Seminar

Instructor: Geoff Lehman

Course times: Wed 10:45 - 12:15, Fri 15:15 - 16:45

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

This course will focus on the problem of pictorial representation in painting, drawing, and photography, considering the (material, structural) conditions that make representation possible, the relationship between pictorial representation and its “model” (whether object or experience) in the world and, perhaps most importantly, the range of experiences arising from the encounter between pictures and their viewers. All the principal topics for the course are ones that are important both within art historical discourse and as larger problems of human experience and (self-)knowledge: originality, nature, space and time, mood, materiality. The course will be guided throughout by sustained discussion of a small number of individual artworks.  Among the artists whose works we will examine are Raphael, Titian, Pieter Bruegel the Elder, Rembrandt van Rijn, Diego Velázquez, Claude Monet, Eugène Atget, Pablo Picasso, Agnes Martin, and Cindy Sherman. Readings will focus on texts in art history and theory (Pater, Wölfflin, Riegl, Barthes, Krauss, Rosand), as well as primary sources (Hesiod, Castiglione, early writings on photography and on Impressionism, selected lyric poems). Visits to Berlin museums to experience works of art firsthand are an integral part of the course.

Syllabus

 

LT251 Poetry and Poetics

Literature and Rhetoric Concentration Seminar

Instructor: Ulrike Wagner

Course times: Wed 10:45 - 12:15, Fri 15:15 - 16:45

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

Poetic forms were once used for a wide variety of subject matter, often to convey knowledge in the branches of the arts and sciences, as metre was valued for its mnemonic effectiveness. In the modern period, poetry is principally considered an aesthetic form, and its various manifestations (the epic, verse drama) became concentrated into the lyric, associated with the self-expression of an individual voice. The modern poet claimed a hidden but somehow powerful influence on culture and society—the position of an “unacknowledged legislator of the world”—or later, in the French tradition, the condition of being “accursed,” a renegade living outside the bounds of the acceptable, inventing new modes of living and creating.  This course provides an introduction to reading poetic forms from Romanticism to the present day, and to the rhetorical figures most relevant for modern poetry, as well as the philosophical and literary theories (of the sublime, romantic art, the nature of ‘poetic language’) which developed in tandem with and sought to interpret the lyric.

Syllabus

 

Electives

SO151 Methods in Social Theory

Concentration: Ethics and Politics

Instructor: Irit Dekel

Course times: Mon 9:00 - 10:30, Wed 13:30 - 15:00

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

In this course we will explore the many branches of the discipline called sociology. We will study classic theory as well as recent contributions in the field of sociology and examine the major questions that guide sociological analysis. We will also practice ‘doing’ sociology by exploring our everyday social world and the forces that shape it which are often invisible or taken for granted. By studying topics in human action, economy, gender, social interaction, inequality, organizations and religion, we will see why it is impossible to make the many faces of sociology into a single scientific discipline. Instead of constructing a science, we will see how these theories and practices help us in understanding the society in which we humans live. In the first half of the semester we will discuss classical readings in sociological theory which we will then draw on for discussion of contemporary issues of gender, class, politics, organizations, knowledge and art.

Syllabus

 

PL254 Continental Philosophy Today

Concentration: Ethics and Politics (cross-listed with Literature and Rhetoric)

Instructor: Frank Ruda

Course times: Mon 10:45 - 12:15, Wed 9:00 - 10:30

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

The academic study of philosophy is largely concerned with the work of thinkers who belong to another historical moment than our own, and who are considered part of a specific "tradition." Yet during the last decade in Europe a series of thinkers have emerged who have exercised a strong influence—one that promises to endure—on contemporary debates in politics and in the arts. These thinkers provide new conceptions of the connections between the distinct spheres in which they are active (for instance, the very relation between aesthetics and politics). They undertake a reformulation of central concepts of Western thought that have a wide significance across the realms of artistic and social transformation (for example, the categories of "potentiality," "action" or "the subject" and "subjectivity"). On many occasions, their work challenges the disciplinary framework of philosophy, drawing on the interpretation of literary forms and on film, and proclaiming the centrality of narrative, poetry, and aesthetic engagement to the active pursuit of philosophy. Above all, they shape positions and perspectives that elaborate a new poetics rather than a “system.” The course will nevertheless aim to identify and examine key tendencies and preoccupations in contemporary continental philosophy, as well as the conclusions that can be derived from its deployment of non-philosophical sources and objects. We consider texts by, among others, Giorgio Agamben, Alain Badiou, Antonio Negri, Jacques Rancière and Slavoj Žižek, pinpointing their implications and uses for both cultural analysis and political diagnosis.

Syllabus

 

SC202 Bioethics: Moral Questions about Biomedical Interference at the Beginning and the End of Human Life

Concentration: Ethics and Politics

Instructor: Jens Reich

Course times: Mon 17:00 - 18:30, Wed 15:15 - 16:45

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

The recent developments in molecular and cell biology, embryology and neurobiology mark a new era in which homo sapiens dares to cross the divide from the planned reconstruction of and mastery over external nature to the redesign of his own inner constitution. This creates a challenge to our self-perception as autonomous beings with a free will, able to make rational decisions about morality and the good life. The unity of the human genus is endangered when a new generation comes into being by design rather than by procreation. The course offers an introduction to these developments and to the central moral and practical questions they pose. Topics include: the beginning of new life (assisted reproduction, preimplantation genetic diagnosis and selection of embryos, human cloning); life and death decisions (voluntary abortion, severely disabled babies, “killing or letting die? ” assisted suicide); genetic enhancement and neural enhancement by drugs.

Syllabus

 

PL255 Totality and Infinity (Advanced Course)

Concentration: Ethics and Politics

Instructor: Tracy Colony

Course times: Mon 9:00 - 10:30, Wed 13:30 - 15:00

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

This elective will be devoted to a close reading of Emmanuel Levinas’ Totality and Infinity: An Essay on Exteriority. Published in 1961, it is one of the most important works in European philosophy. In a number of respects, it marks an absolute break with earlier philosophies in its reinterpretation of the role of ethics in understanding subjectivity, language and time. In this course, we will focus on the themes of visibility and form and ask how these relate to Levinas’ understanding of the Other. In addition, we will contextualize this work in relation to the philosophies of Edmund Husserl and Martin Heidegger--from which it explicitly departs--and also trace its later reception in the work of Jacques Derrida and Catherine Malabou. All texts will be read and discussed in English, but simultaneous readings in the original French will be supported and encouraged.

Syllabus

 

PL256 Philosophy and Painting

Concentration: Art and Aesthetics 

Instructor: Peter Hajnal

Course times: Wed 17:00 - 18:30, Fri 13:30 - 15:00

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

Why do philosophers look at paintings, what happens when they do, and what can we learn from these encounters? In this course we will be studying classic examples of such philosophical readings, but we will also be looking at the paintings that these arguments invoke, and thinking about what it means to read them philosophically. Not only will this activity help us to understand better art-historians’ invocation (or rejection, as the case may be) of philosophical arguments, it will also lead us to think in interesting ways about what philosophical problems are in general. In turn, these multiple perspectives will enable us to think about the relationships between the aesthetic, critical, and historical modes of evaluation. But the most important aim of the course is to develop a practical understanding of what it means to look at a painting philosophically, and thereby to enrich our ability to engage with the artworks themselves. Texts will include selections from Plato, Cusanus, Alberti, Leonardo, Ficino, Diderot, Hegel, Dewey, Worringer, Heidegger, Lukács, Sartre, Merleau-Ponty, Foucault, Deleuze, Wollheim, Greenberg, Danto, Goodman, Gaut, Baxandall, Margolis, and Pippin.

Syllabus

 

FA103 Projects in Drawing: Observational Drawings

Concentration: Art and Aesthetics

Instructor: John Kleckner

Course times: Wed 17:00 - 18:30, Fri 13:30 - 15:00

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

The core topic of this course is observational drawing. We will explore a variety of approaches and techniques for translating the 3-dimensional forms we see into 2-dimensional drawings. The goal will be to cultivate and exercise each student’s skills in visual thinking, with the aim of improving fluency in communicating through drawing. This is a hands-on studio course. The majority of class time will be spent drawing from live models and dynamic still-life arrangements (not the typical flowers and fruit on a table.) The rest of class will be filled with group critiques, slide presentations, and homework assignments. The ideal student will be highly motivated, with a strong interest in studying and producing art, and must be comfortable with presenting their artistic creations to peers in class discussions.

Syllabus

 

TH237 Dance Lab: From Exploring to Performing

Concentration: Art and Aesthetics

Instructor: Eva Burghardt

Course times: Wed 17:00 - 18:30, Fri 13:30 - 15:00

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

This is a practice-oriented course, designed as an introduction to contemporary dance and improvisation technique, as well as a space to explore body-based performance work in a broader sense.

In the first half of the semester we will focus on movement and dance-based training, drawing from contemporary dance techniques and bodyworks, such as Release Technique and Body-Mind Centering. The practice of presence and bodily awareness will be the core focus, forming the basis for any performative work.

Adding to this foundation work, students will be introduced to dance improvisation technique, developing and expanding their movement vocabulary. Rather than prescribing a specific aesthetic, the aim is to give a framework for individual exploration and expression. Solo and group improvisations will lead to Instant Compositions, and create short pieces of dance that are created in the moment.

The second half of the semester will shift the focus to composing and choreography. Different layers of composition such as use of space, timing, rhythm, atmosphere, dramaturgy and story will be explored. Students will be encouraged to bring in their own ideas, texts, music etc. and find different performative formats. Students can choose whether they would like to choreograph or perform or both. A final presentation of student work will take place at the end of the semester.

Through practice and critiques, students will learn to see, analyse and talk about various aspects of dance/performance. Excursions to dance performances in Berlin, including discussions afterwards, will be an integral part of the course.

Syllabus

 

AH231 Cultures of Display: The Berlin Art Museums

A joint seminar between the TU Berlin and Bard College Berlin

Concentration: Art and Aesthetics

Instructors: Andrea Meyer (TU Berlin) and Aya Soika

Course times: April 24, 17:00 – 20:00; May 14, 16:30 – 18:00; May 15, 16:30 – 20:00; May 16, 15:30 – 18:00; May 22, 10:00 – 18:00; May 23, 10:00 – 16:30

Credits: 4 ECTS, 2 U.S. credits

“Art” is not only the objects and events ranged under this name, but the contexts in which these objects and happenings are assembled and presented. A knowledge of the history, politics and challenges particular to the display and storing of art is essential to any understanding of the value and interpretation of the art object. This course introduces the only UNESCO heritage site in the world to be consituted by five geographically proximate art museums: the Old Museum, the New Museum, the Old National Gallery, the Bode Museum and the Pergamon Museum, on the “museum island” in Berlin. We will first consider the desires and goals that lay behind the building and definition of the nineteenth-century museum, from the reassertion of a “Prussian” identity following the Napoleonic Wars, to the grand ambitions of the German Empire. We will consider how the conceptualization of the twentieth-century museum reacted against these aims and aesthetics, and how the damage to the nineteenth-century landscape of Berlin in the First and Second World Wars affected the presentation of the city’s art heritage. Through a combination of the study of façades, interiors and the placement of individual works, we will consider issues of appropriation, provenance and restitution.

Syllabus

 

LT252 Post-colonial Literature and Theory

Concentration: Literature and Rhetoric (cross-listed with Ethics and Politics)

Instructor: Kerry Bystrom

Course times: Mon 10:45 - 12:15, Wed 9:00 - 10:30

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

In the Berlin Conference of 1884-5, nearing the height of their imperial power, European leaders sat around a table in Germany and carved up the African continent between them—without bothering to consult a single African representative. This course explores the historical practices and cultural formations that allowed such colonial usurpations to happen; but more centrally it charts the ways in which writers and intellectuals in Africa, the Americas, the Middle East and Asia responded to colonization and examines the spectres of colonial history that haunt Europe and the United States today. The semester will be organized around a series of seminal essays, novels, and films, which range from Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness and Werner Herzog’s Fitzcarraldo to Edward Said’s Orientalism, Che Guevara’s Guerilla Warfare: A Method, Gilles Pontecorvo’s The Battle of Algiers and Salman Rushdie’s The Satanic Verses. We will pay particular attention to the historical development of post-colonial theory, now accepted as one of the major theoretical schools of literary and cultural analysis.

Syllabus

 

IS311 Berlin: Experiment in Modernity

Bard in Berlin Core Course

Instructor: Florian Becker

Course times: Mon 17:00 - 18:30, Wed 15:15 - 16:45, Fri (Museum visit - off campus) 15:15 - 19:00

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

More than any other city, Berlin has been a source and a theater for the forces shaping Western modernity. Its importance and its by turns glorious and catastrophic role in European culture and history have their origins in its peculiar development. Built on a swamp, in a poor duchy surrounded by more powerful states, it was remade during the Enlightenment as a center not only of military discipline and administrative control but also of learning and innovation. Increasingly characterized in the later nineteenth century by almost uncontrolled growth, it rose to the status of capital of the German Empire and became a center of science and technology. With rapid industrialization came sharp social polarization and bitter political conflict, but also the birth of aesthetic modernism and avantgarde culture. After the clamor for imperial power and colonial expansion culminated in the cataclysm of World War I, Berlin witnessed the unprecedented artistic rebirth of the Weimar Republic. During the Nazi dictatorship the city became the point of origin of political terror, war and genocide. Reduced to little more than “a pile of rubble near Potsdam” (Bertolt Brecht), Berlin found itself on the frontline of the Cold War and remained forcibly divided for more than four decades between two radically different political and economic systems. Through a combination of historical sources, literature, philosophy, and a wide range of artifacts—from paintings to photographs to film, archival and contemporary—we shall seek to understand Berlin’s significance and its current position at the heart of Europe. And we will speculate about its possible futures as a place of gathering and experiment for a population from across the world.

Syllabus

 

IS332 Berlin Institutions: Values in Practice (Internship Seminar)

Instructor: Florian Duijsens

Course times: Wed 10:45 - 12:15

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits in combination with an internship

This course accompanies students' undertaking of an internship or period of practical training, and addresses such issues as: the successful functioning of institutions, the role of guiding principles and values in determining the direction and structure of projects and initiatives, and the relationship between the various spheres of society (the state, the market, individual or collective agency) in influencing the way institutions operate. Particular focus will be on Berlin and its unusually diverse combination of political, artistic and citizen-activist organizations.

Syllabus

Language Courses

GM101 German Beginner A1

Instructor: Silke Hilgers

Course times: Mon 15:15 - 16:45, Tue 17:00 - 18:30, Thu 15:15 - 16:45

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

Syllabus

GM151 German Beginner A2

Instructor: Silke Hilgers

Course times: Mon 13:30 - 15:00, Tue 13:30 - 15:00, Thu 9:00 - 10:30

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

Syllabus

Instructor: Ulrike Harnisch

Course times: Mon 15:15 - 16:45, Tue 17:00 - 18:30, Fri 9:00 - 10:30

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

Syllabus

GM201 German Intermediate B1

Instructor: Ulrike Wagner

Course times: Mon 15:15 - 16:45, Tue 15:15 - 16:45, Fri 10:45 - 12:15

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

Syllabus

GM251 German Intermediate B2

Instructor: Ulrike Harnisch

Course times: Tue 15:15 - 16:45, Thu 9:00 - 10:30, Fri 10:45 - 12:15

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

Syllabus

GM301 German Advanced C1

Instructor: Ulrike Wagner

Course times: Mon 13:30 - 15:00, Tue 13:30 - 15:00, Fri 9:00 - 10:30

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

Syllabus

FR201 French Intermediate B1

Instructor: Edit Gerelyes

Course times: Mon 13:30 - 15:00, Tue 13:30 - 15:00, Thu 9:00 - 10:30

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

Syllabus

FR251 French Intermediate B2

Instructor: Edit Gerelyes

Course times: Mon 10:45 - 12:15, Wed 9:00 - 10:30, Fri 9:00 - 10:30

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

Syllabus

SP101 Spanish Beginner A1

Instructor: David Perucha

Course times: Tue 17:00 - 18:30, Thu 15:15 - 16:45, Fri 13:30 - 15:00

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

Syllabus

SP251 Spanish Intermediate B2

Instructor: David Perucha

Course times: Tue 15:15 - 16:45, Thu 9:00 - 10:30, Fri 10:45 - 12:15

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

Syllabus

All Bard College Berlin language courses address the development of skills in reading and listening comprehension, conversation and writing within the context of the European Framework of Languages from level A1 through C2.

Beginner German, French, Spanish A1
Emphasis on familiar vocabulary building, listening comprehension and speaking with gradual introduction to grammar and writing skills. 
D. Deichfuß, E. Gerelyes, D. Perucha

Beginner German, French, Spanish A2
Continued emphasis on listening comprehension and routine communication. Students read and write short, simple texts. 
D. Deichfuß, E. Gerelyes, D. Perucha

Intermediate German, French, Spanish B1 
Emphasis on communication skills including comprehension of standard speech and descriptive reading passages, topical conversation and simple, descriptive composition. 
D. Deichfuß, E. Gerelyes, D. Perucha

Intermediate German, French, Spanish B2 
Continued emphasis on communication skills including comprehension of extended speeches and lectures, reading of newspapers and general periodicals, spontaneous conversational interaction with native speakers and writing clear, detailed text on a wide range of subjects. 
D. Deichfuß, E. Gerelyes, D. Perucha

Advanced German Language, French, Spanish C1
Development of listening and reading comprehension levels to include extended speech and some literary texts. Emphasis on conversational and writing skills to express ideas and opinions and present detailed descriptions expressing points of view. 
D. Deichfuß, E. Gerelyes, D. Perucha

Advanced German Language, French, Spanish C2 
Development of comprehension skills to allow for understanding of all forms of spoken language and written texts. Emphasis on communication skills for the fluent expression of ideas and argument both orally and in written form. 
D. Deichfuß, E. Gerelyes, D. Perucha

Bard College Berlin typically offers students three levels of language instruction, beginning, intermediate and advanced. Placement tests determine each student’s enrolment level.