Courses Fall 2013

Core Courses

Concentration Seminars

Electives

Language Courses

Core Courses

IS101 Greek Civilization: Plato’s Republic and Its Interlocutors

AY/BA1/Bard1 Core Course

Coordinator: Michael Weinman

Course times: Tue 9:00 - 12:15, Thur 13:30 - 16:45

Credits: 14 ECTS, 8 U.S. credits

Bard College Berlin's core curriculum begins with a semester-long investigation of Plato’s Republic in its cultural, political, and intellectual context. This text—in conversation with what we here figure as its “interlocutors,” the main works and movements with which it is in dialogue—offers a unique point of entry into the epochal literary, philosophical, cultural and political achievements of fifth and fourth century Athens. Republic depicts and draws us into a discussion of the kinds of values (ethical, political, aesthetic, religious, epistemic, and literary) at the heart of Bard College Berlin's approach to education, and fundamental to human life itself. Rather than a series of separate treatises, the Republic treats these values as the subject of a single investigation that transcends disciplinary boundaries as we have come to conceive of them. And while it may be said to contain a “social contract” theory, a theory of psychology, a theory of demonstration, a theology, a critique of mimetic art, a theory of education, or a typology of political regimes among other proposals, it is reducible to none of these. Simply, this text, perhaps in a manner unlike any other written before or after, sets the agenda for any set of research questions that one might wish to pursue today. In this course we shall be particularly attentive to the dialogic character of Plato’s writing, and to its exchanges with other authors, works, genres and kinds of thought in the Greek tradition. Reading Plato’s work alongside Homer’s Iliad, Hesiod’s Works and Days, Euripides’sBacchae, Parmenides’s poem, Aristophanes’s Clouds, Herodotus’ Histories and Thucydides’ (so-called) History of the Peloponnesian War, and a selection from Euclid’s Elements, together with a lecture and seminar on the Parthenon and a visit to both the Pergamon and the Trojan collection at the Neues Museum, we will strive to better appreciate and evaluate the argument and drama of the Republic. As we read the Republic and attend to the conversations it has with its interlocutors, we aim to become informed and engaging interlocutors for Plato and for one another.

Syllabus

 

IS102 Renaissance Art and Thought: Renaissance Florence

BA2 Core Course

Coordinator: Geoff Lehman

Course times: Tue 9:30 - 12:45, Thur 13:30 - 16:45

Credits: 14 ECTS, 8 U.S. credits

In this course we examine the visual and intellectual culture of Renaissance Florence.  A sustained engagement with a number of principal monuments in Florentine painting, sculpture, and architecture provides the basis for a consideration of key values within the development of Renaissance art that also shape, more broadly, the thought, cultural practices, and everyday experiences of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. The Renaissance could be characterized as a historical period in which the visual arts played the leading role within intellectual culture. Thus the focus on works of visual art, in a sustained dialogue with literary, philosophical, and political texts of the period, opens upon a consideration of broad, trans-disciplinary problems such as the emergence of new models of subjectivity and objectivity, the relationship between religious and secular experiences, the framing of early modern political thought, and the origins of the scientific method.  The course is structured around four principal topics, each a defining value for the visual arts between the thirteenth and the sixteenth centuries that is also central to the development of Renaissance thought: naturalism and realism; perspective; harmony and grace; humanism. The direct experience, evaluation, and interpretation of individual works of art are a crucial part of the course, and with this in mind there will be frequent visits to Berlin’s museums, particularly the Gemäldegalerie and the Bode Museum, with their extensive Renaissance collections, to encounter works of art firsthand.

Syllabus

 

IS311 Berlin: Experiment in Modernity

Bard in Berlin

Instructor: Florian Becker

Course times: Mon 17:00 - 18:30, Wed 15:15 - 16:45, Fri (Museum visit - off campus) 15:15 - 19:00

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

More than any other city, Berlin has been a source and a theater for the forces shaping Western modernity. Its importance and its by turns glorious and catastrophic role in European culture and history have their origins in its peculiar development. Built on a swamp, in a poor duchy surrounded by more powerful states, it was remade during the Enlightenment as a center not only of military discipline and administrative control but also of learning and innovation. Increasingly characterized in the later nineteenth century by almost uncontrolled growth, it rose to the status of capital of the German Empire and became a center of science and technology. With rapid industrialization came sharp social polarization and bitter political conflict, but also the birth of aesthetic modernism and avant-garde culture. After the clamor for imperial power and colonial expansion culminated in the cataclysm of World War I, Berlin witnessed the unprecedented artistic rebirth of the Weimar Republic. During the Nazi dictatorship the city became the point of origin of political terror, war and genocide. Reduced to little more than “a pile of rubble near Potsdam” (Bertolt Brecht), Berlin found itself on the frontline of the Cold War and remained forcibly divided for more than four decades between two radically different political and economic systems. Through a combination of historical sources, literature, philosophy, and a wide range of artifacts—from paintings to photographs to film, archival and contemporary—we shall seek to understand Berlin’s significance and its current position at the heart of Europe. And we will speculate about its possible futures as a place of gathering and experiment for a population from across the world. 

Syllabus

 

IS301 Bildung: Education and Formation

BA4/PY Core Course

Instructor: Matthias Hurst

Course times: Thur 15:15 - 18:30

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

This seminar is dedicated to the exploration of the ideals that guide our pursuit of knowledge and understanding. One focus will be on Bildung, a concept that has played a key role in German thought from the 18th century to today, and has become the cornerstone of German academia as well as the central preoccupation of an influential literary genre, the Bildungsroman. The term Bildung has no equivalent in English, but possible translations are “education,” “formation,” “self-cultivation” or “culture.” It describes not only a process of education, but also its result: a state of maturity and cultural refinement that is supposed to reconcile the needs of the individual with the demands of the world. Bildung seeks, claimed Wilhelm von Humboldt, “the true end of Man,” “the highest and most harmonious development of his powers to a complete and consistent whole.” As a concept of ideal education and self-cultivation fuelled by the principles of European Enlightenment, Bildung encompasses understanding, knowledge, reflection, aesthetic consciousness and competence in social judgement and political action; it addresses issues of liberation and emancipation in both individual and social perspective. The concept of Bildung has a wide variety of connotations and dimensions, not only pedagogical, but philosophical, psychological, political and cultural. The aim of the class is to build up a critical understanding of the ideals and implications of Bildung by studying some of the classic authors who helped articulate and establish it (Humboldt, Fichte, Schiller) and by discussing examples of the Bildungsroman from its beginning (Goethe’s Wilhelm Meister's Apprenticeship, 1795) to later variations (Musil’s The Confusions of Young Törless, 1906, and Hesse’s Demian, 1919). The novels describe and analyse the possibilities and problems of education and formation and the clash between the individual and society, between formal education and living experience. We will also take a look at the development of the concept of Bildung in the 20th century, the transformation of its ideals (in response to the crucial cultural changes of modernity) and the problems arising from the apparent disappearance of a classical canon of Bildung. A series of films supplement the discourse on education and self-cultivation and broaden our perspective and approach.

Syllabus

 

IS123 Research Seminar

BA4/PY Core

Instructor: James Harker

Course times: Tue 11:15 - 12:45, Fri 16:00 - 17:30

This seminar will serve as a thesis-writing workshop. In the first part of the course, sessions will be devoted to the practicalities of planning a project, conducting research, outlining, and writing. During this portion, we will also hear from faculty members about how they develop large research projects. In the second part of the course, each student will have the opportunity to present an early version of his or her thesis, with the goal of supportive feedback. 

Syllabus

 

Concentration Seminars

PT228 Freedom

Ethics and Politics Concentration Seminar

Instructor: Katalin Makkai

Course times: Wed 9:00 - 10:30, Fri 13:30 - 15:00

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

The notion of “freedom” lies at the heart of much thinking about the life well lived and its interpersonal, social, ethical and political conditions. In theory as in practice we regularly speak of such forms of freedom as the freedom of speech, freedom of action, and freedom of expression. Whether or not a person does something of her own free will makes a difference to how we think of her conduct. In the first Ethics and Politics concentration seminar, we explore a range of conceptions of freedom from the ancients to the moderns. We begin with the notion of “self-rule” in Plato and Aristotle. Turning to the modern period, we read Locke and Rousseau, juxtaposing the predominantly “negative” conception of freedom emphasized in Locke (freedom from interference) with the more “positive” conception articulated in Rousseau in terms of a kind of substantive self-relation that is inseparable from certain relations with others. We examine Kant’s emphasis on individual autonomy as freedom of the will (and as articulated in terms of a commitment to morality that involves my not being determined by my natural, desiring self), paying attention to its sources in Rousseau’s thought. We compare Mill’s articulation of freedom in terms of my desires and impulses being my own and expressing my character: freedom as involving self-expression and the development of individual identity. The course closes with Nietzsche’s and Beauvoir’s critiques and radicalizations of modern conceptions of autonomy. We center on the ways in which these authors draw attention to the historical and pernicious character of supposedly atemporal characterizations of ideals of freedom.

Syllabus

 

AR225 What is (Modern) Art?

Art and Aesthetics Concentration Seminar

Instructor: Aya Soika

Course times: Tue 13:30 - 15:00, Fri 13:30 - 15:00

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

This class discusses the changing significance of art in the nineteenth and twentieth century. In addition to acquainting students with new modes of pictorial representation and the re-definition of artistic practices, one of its goals is to introduce the historical conditions and problems connected with the advent of modernism in the visual arts. Definitions of what constitutes the “modern” or “avant-garde” status of works of art are manifold. Primary sources, such as contemporary reviews, artists’ letters and manifestos shed light on the intentions, rhetoric and public reception of radical artistic projects at the emergence of modernism. Later art-historical interpretations - ranging from formalist approaches to investigations into the social and political conditions of modern life – help to establish conceptual frameworks within which individual works can be placed and understood. Visits to Berlin’s major collections of modern art are an integral part of the course syllabus.

Syllabus

 

LT247 Rhetoric of the Novel

Literature and Rhetoric Concentration Seminar

Instructor: James Harker

Course times: Wed 9:00 - 10:30, Fri 13:30 - 15:00

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

A few generations ago, rhetoric was primarily the study of how argumentative texts work. Literary theory focused mostly on poetry and the epic. But in the twentieth century, “rhetorical criticism” was expanded to include other kinds of text, including literary ones. Meanwhile, narrative forms such as the folktale and the novel became more significant objects of literary-critical interest. In this course, we will consider how these paths merged. To get there, we will survey critical innovations in literary and narrative theory from New Criticism to the present, while we attend to the ways in which rhetoric informs these methodologies. Thus we will consider the “narrative of rhetoric” in addition to the “rhetoric of narrative”. Our reading of narrative theory will be informed by analysis of narratives in several styles, but we will focus on the most influential form of narrative literature in the modern era: the novel. We will use our emerging rhetorical and critical vocabularies to describe the novel’s formal developments, from its eighteenth-century origins to its dominant nineteenth-century form, “realism”, as well as modernist and postmodernist practices.  Novels will include Madame Bovary, Flaubert; The Good Soldier, Ford; Jealousy, Robbe-Grillet, and Austerlitz, Sebald.

Syllabus

 

Electives

SO150 Past in the present

Concentration: Ethics and Politics (cross-listed with Art and Aesthetics)

Instructor: Irit Dekel

Course times: Mon 10:45 - 12:15, Wed 10:45 - 12:15

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

This course examines the interrelations between the ways the past is represented and acted upon, or the culture and politics of this process. The focus will be on civil society initiatives rather than on state-orchestrated commemoration. We will draw on cases from modern European (specifically German) memory politics after WWII, and on examples from Israel and Palestine. The central question the course addresses is how collective memory is a social phenomenon that enacts the past but is always embedded in present politics and culture. We will then look into the different “sites” of studying collective memory, from social agency, identity construction and cosmopolitanism, to sites of memory, their aesthetics and architecture, and to the phenomena of tourism and consumption. We will proceed by focusing on specific sites of remembrance such as memorials, ruins, museums, trials, testimony and oral history. In class and in assignments we will discuss theoretical texts as well as memorial sites, exhibitions, works of art and archival materials. We will conclude by examining three recently created sites of remembrance that combine in their history as well as in their form and utilization various modes of memory work: The Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe in Berlin, and its relations to the newly opened Sinti and Roma Memorial and the Memorial to Homosexual victims of National Socialism, all in the center of Berlin. In our reading we will discuss social and personal experience and performance of social memory through the writing of Halbwachs, Connerton, Durkheim, Freud, Alexander, Olick and others.

Syllabus

 

PT229 Hegel’s Philosophy of Right (Advanced Elective)

Concentration: Ethics and Politics

Instructor: Frank Ruda

Course times: Mon 9:00 - 10:30, Wed 13:30 - 15:00

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

After Plato’s Republic, Hegel’s Philosophy of Right might be said to be one of the most controversial and important works in the history of political thought. It has been attacked on a variety of grounds. Some commentators claim that it functions merely as an idealizing defence of the Prussian state as it was being reconstituted at the time of the text’s writing. Others argue that it opposes representative democracy and ultimately promotes totalitarianism. Further criticisms contend that it diminishes the role of individual freedom and presents a substantialist, proto-nationalist account of communal organization. Finally, and most paradoxically, it has been thought to represent the claim that philosophy has no role to play in deciding political questions. The course will chart a path through the theses that the Hegelian text provokes and contextualize them adequately. We begin with the well-known preface where Hegel equates the movement of philosophy with the flight of the “owl of Minerva” (which commences “only at the falling of dusk”) and end with the passage from the state in its totality to the movement of history. To properly clarify the progress of thought that Hegel presents, we will often highlight Hegel’s complex arguments by making recourse to supplementary readings (of other texts by Hegel himself or by contemporary Hegelians from Robert Pippin to Slavoj Žižek).

Syllabus

 

FA102 Artists & Publications (Advanced Elective)

Concentration: Art and Aesthetics

Instructor: Caleb Waldorf / Aya Soika

Course times: Mon 10:45 - 12:15, Wed 10:45 - 12:15

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

This course will introduce students to how artists have utilized publication as a form for an artwork, as well as provide a platform for practice-based studio experimentation in this format. From Max Ernst’s Une Semaine de Bonté, to Andy Warhol’s design of Aspen, to Jordan Crandall’s Blast sculpture cast in fiberglass, artists have established a diverse approach to the use of publication. Moving from the early 20th century to the present, we will examine how artist publications are not simply a means of representing existing artworks, but a method of working that holds distinct characteristics from traditional modes of exhibition and display. Individually and collaboratively, students will deploy this research to explore the use of publication in their own studio practices. What is produced will not necessarily be medium-specific (static, printed or bound), but rather emerge from an understanding of publication as a field of practice that can take a multitude of forms.

The course will be supplemented by museum visits and discussions with Berlin-based publishers and artists working in this area.

Syllabus

 

TH241 Introduction to American and German Theater

Concentration: Art and Aesthetics

Instructor: Julia Hart

Course times: Fri 10:45 - 12:15 & 13:30 - 15:00

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

This is a survey course to introduce students to the very different theater traditions of the United States and Germany. We will first take a brief look at the theater history and the role of the theater in each country to understand how differences in acting and directing approaches developed. This course will then focus on a comparison of major acting and directing techniques of both countries. Through a combination of readings, discussions, and practical scenic work students will gain insights into the main ideas behind American and German theater. Each topic will be first addressed in a seminar setting with readings, short essays, and a seminar discussion. Then students will experiment with various acting and directing methods in the rehearsal room themselves. Throughout the semester we will look at scenes from one specific play (for example from Shakespeare or Anton Chekhov) and rehearse this play under the different lenses of German and American theater. Students will be graded on participation in course discussions, two short essays, critique of each others' work, and a final scene presentation at the end of the semester.

Syllabus

 

PL257 Jacques Rancičre: The Space of Conflict Between Art and Philosophy (Advanced Elective)

Concentration: Art and Aesthetics

Instructor: Bruno Besana

Course times: Mon 10:45 - 12:15, Wed 10:45 - 12:15

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

The work of Jacques Rancičre will be used in this course as a tool to develop a series of lines of inquiry in the relation between philosophy and art, with a particular focus on contemporary art. Namely, we will try to see how aesthetics, far from being that part of philosophy that provides a descriptive and normative account of the history and of the essence of art, is rather configured as a battlefield, as a place of fractures, interruptions, disagreements which are far from being without political consequences.

First we will try to reconstruct Rancičre’s idea of the contemporary regime of art as determined by a certain confusion between the active and the passive, between the expressivity of nature and the will of the subject. This first part will allow us to investigate the history of aesthetics by means of an analysis of texts from Plato, Aristotle, Baumgarten, Kant, the Romantics and Hegel. Also, we will investigate Rancičre criticism of various claims (articulated by Barthes and Benjamin among others) that there is a ‘proper’ of art.

In a second moment, we will analyse Rancičre’s understanding of the history of art in terms of discontinuities and fractures, by placing his work in parallel with a series of other readings that aim at subverting the classical idea of philosophy ‘reflecting’ on art (Nancy, Deleuze, Badiou).

Thirdly, we will focus on his critiques of two ideas of contemporary art: the idea of an art that, finally liberated from representational structures, would express ‘the real’; and the idea of an art bound to the fundamental impossibility of expressing the real of a century whose catastrophies have challenged the viability of representation itself. This inquiry will allow us to approach the analysis of individual artists (Godard, Jia Zhang-ke, Medvedkin, Alfredo Jaar) but also to investigate the history and the contemporary reception of the concept of the sublime (Kant, Schiller, Lyotard).

In a fourth and final moment we will analyse how Rancičre aims at individuating the political consequences of those singular moments in which the modes of production of art are reconfigured, along with the modes of relation between genres and styles and the modes of circulation and perception of art. We will then insert his conclusions in the contemporary debate about art and power (Boris Groys) and analyse the reception of Rancičre’s work by contemporary curators and artists.

Syllabus

 

LT248 Home and Exile (Studies in Literature and Human Rights)

Concentration: Literature and Rhetoric (cross-listed with Ethics and Politics)

Instructor: Kerry Bystrom

Course times: Mon 9:00 - 10:30, Wed 13:30 - 15:00

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

Both the right to a nationality and the right to emigrate are guaranteed through the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR). Although philosophers as influential to the contemporary human rights system as Immanuel Kant have theorized a “right to hospitality” for those forced to leave their home states, however, the UDHR does not oblige nation-states to accept refugees and asylum seekers. Many individuals are thus left with little recourse to their stipulated rights. How can we understand the importance of having a physical and national “home,” or the emotional, psychological, and socio-economic effects of being forced to flee from it? How is it possible to represent the experience of exile and the legacy that it leaves on present and future generations? What is and what should be the impact of refugees and other migrants on this “homeland,” Germany, or “Fortress Europe” more widely? We will address these questions (and others) by exploring a wide range of literature and film from the 20th century, as well as by analyzing theoretical essays and international legal covenants related to questions of home, exile, refugee status, internally displaced peoples, and “statelessness.” Core texts will include non-fictional memoirs like Levi’s Survival in Auschwitz, films such as Resnais’ Hiroshima Mon Amour, novels like Phillips’s A Distant Shore, and readings from Arendt’s Origins of Totalitarianism.

Syllabus

 

LT249 Comparative Perspectives on the Romantic Revolution (Advanced Elective)

Concentration: Literature and Rhetoric (cross-listed with Ethics and Politics)

Instructor: Ulrike Wagner

Course times: Mon 13:30 - 15:00, Fri 9:00 - 10:30

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

With its emergence in Britain and Germany in the 1790s, Romanticism altered our thinking in virtually all domains of human activity and ushered in modernity. The movement sparked a profound shift in the fields of art and literature, in our view of nature, politics, and personal identity. In this course we will read poems, novels, collections and translations, travel narratives, and essays by German, British, French, and American authors and examine how the revolutionary rupture of the age altered generic conventions and introduced new practices of writing and forms of expression across cultures. Our goal will be to discover how the key concern of the age – the relationship of the individual to a greater whole such as the nation, nature, the divine or artistic truth – manifests itself in the rise of new modes of expression and generic innovation. This approach to Romanticism will also shed light on the cultural-historical origins of what lies at the heart of a modern liberal arts education.

Syllabus

 

IS311 Berlin: Experiment in Modernity

Instructor: Florian Becker

Course times: Mon 17:00 - 18:30, Wed 15:15 - 16:45, Fri (Museum visit - off campus) 15:15 - 19:00

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

More than any other city, Berlin has been a source and a theater for the forces shaping Western modernity. Its importance and its by turns glorious and catastrophic role in European culture and history have their origins in its peculiar development. Built on a swamp, in a poor duchy surrounded by more powerful states, it was remade during the Enlightenment as a center not only of military discipline and administrative control but also of learning and innovation. Increasingly characterized in the later nineteenth century by almost uncontrolled growth, it rose to the status of capital of the German Empire and became a center of science and technology. With rapid industrialization came sharp social polarization and bitter political conflict, but also the birth of aesthetic modernism and avant-garde culture. After the clamor for imperial power and colonial expansion culminated in the cataclysm of World War I, Berlin witnessed the unprecedented artistic rebirth of the Weimar Republic. During the Nazi dictatorship the city became the point of origin of political terror, war and genocide. Reduced to little more than “a pile of rubble near Potsdam” (Bertolt Brecht), Berlin found itself on the frontline of the Cold War and remained forcibly divided for more than four decades between two radically different political and economic systems. Through a combination of historical sources, literature, philosophy, and a wide range of artifacts—from paintings to photographs to film, archival and contemporary—we shall seek to understand Berlin’s significance and its current position at the heart of Europe. And we will speculate about its possible futures as a place of gathering and experiment for a population from across the world. The fall section of the course focuses on Berlin's history up to World War I.

Syllabus

 

IS331 Berlin Institutions: Values in Practice (Internship Seminar)

Instructor: Florian Duijsens

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits in combination with an internship

Course times: Tue 9:30 - 11:00

This course accompanies students' undertaking of an internship or period of practical training, and addresses such issues as: the successful functioning of institutions, the role of guiding principles and values in determining the direction and structure of projects and initiatives, and the relationship between the various spheres of society (the state, the market, individual or collective agency) in influencing the way institutions operate. Particular focus will be on Berlin and its unusually diverse combination of political, artistic and citizen-activist organizations.

Syllabus

 

Language Courses

GM101 German Beginner A1

Instructor: Silke Hilgers

Course times: Mon 13:30 - 15:00, Tue 17:00 - 18:30, Wed 17:00 - 18:30

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

Syllabus

Instructor: Ulrike Wagner

Course times: Mon 15:15 - 16:45, Tue 15:15 - 16:45, Thu 10:45 - 12:15

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

Syllabus

GM151 German Beginner A2

Instructor: Ulrike Harnisch

Course times: Mon 13:30 - 15:00, Tue 17:00 - 18:30, Fri 9:00 - 10:30

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

Syllabus

GM201 German Intermediate B1

Instructor: Ulrike Wagner

Course times: Tue 13:30 - 15:00, Thu 9:00 - 10:30, Fri 10:45 - 12:15

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

Syllabus

GM251 German Intermediate B2

Instructor: Ulrike Harnisch

Course times: Mon 15:15 - 16:45, Tue 15:15 - 16:45, Thu 10:45 - 12:15

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

Syllabus

FR101 French Beginner A1

Instructor: Edit Gerelyes

Course times: Tue 13:30-15:00, Wed 9:00-10:30, Fri 13:30-15:00

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

Syllabus

FR201 French Intermediate B1

Instructor: Edit Gerelyes

Course times: Tue 15:15 - 16:45, Thu 10:45 - 12:15, Fri 10:45 - 12:15

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

Syllabus

SP101 Spanish Beginner A1

Instructor: David Perucha

Course times: Mon 15:15 - 16:45, Tue 15:15 - 16:45, Thu 10:45 - 12:15

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

Syllabus

SP201 Spanish Intermediate B1

Instructor: David Perucha

Course times: Mon 17:00 - 18:30, Tue 13:30 - 15:00, Thu 9:00 - 10:30

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

Syllabus

All Bard College Berlin language courses address the development of skills in reading and listening comprehension, conversation and writing within the context of the European Framework of Languages from level A1 through C2.

Beginner German, French, Spanish A1
Emphasis on familiar vocabulary building, listening comprehension and speaking with gradual introduction to grammar and writing skills. 

Beginner German, French, Spanish A2
Continued emphasis on listening comprehension and routine communication. Students read and write short, simple texts. 

Intermediate German, French, Spanish B1 
Emphasis on communication skills including comprehension of standard speech and descriptive reading passages, topical conversation and simple, descriptive composition. 

Intermediate German, French, Spanish B2 
Continued emphasis on communication skills including comprehension of extended speeches and lectures, reading of newspapers and general periodicals, spontaneous conversational interaction with native speakers and writing clear, detailed text on a wide range of subjects. 

Advanced German Language, French, Spanish C1
Development of listening and reading comprehension levels to include extended speech and some literary texts. Emphasis on conversational and writing skills to express ideas and opinions and present detailed descriptions expressing points of view. 

Advanced German Language, French, Spanish C2 
Development of comprehension skills to allow for understanding of all forms of spoken language and written texts. Emphasis on communication skills for the fluent expression of ideas and argument both orally and in written form. 

Bard College Berlin typically offers students three levels of language instruction, beginning, intermediate and advanced. Placement tests determine each student’s enrollment level.