Arts & Society in Berlin

Program overview

With its conflicted past, its central role in European and global economics and politics, its rich history and fabled openness to artists and intellectuals of all kinds, Berlin is the scene of a vital exploration of the roles the arts can play in today’s changing world. 

“Arts & Society in Berlin” draws on Bard College Berlin’s long commitment to artistic creation and civic engagement to present this new semester program, which offers a mix of practicing arts courses, exposure to art history and theory, and engagement with the Berlin arts world. 



 

Berlin is a city where if you have a vision, things just come together. There are so many people who are willing to start something from nothing, and there is so much energy, that all you have to do is harness it and immediately start making connections, and those connections will produce more connections. There is so much possibility in that sense.
--Isabella Lee (USA), exchange student from Simon's Rock

The "Arts & Society in Berlin" semester program is based in artistic practice, including studio arts, performance, media, and the interplay among them. History and theory courses take an interdisciplinary approach to old and new perspectives and experiments, exploring such issues as artistic identity; the nature of performance; ethics, aesthetics and consumption; visual culture in the digital age; and political identity and urban landscapes.

Optional internship

Drawing on ties to artistic circles in Berlin and on the excitement generated by the city’s changing culture and population, “Arts & Society in Berlin” also offers an optional internship with a practicing artist, an arts organization, or an institution active in the social and educational fields. Examples include Agency V (fashion and lifestyle PR and marketing agency), emerge (magazine of photojournalism), Frisch & Co. (Berlin-based ebook company), Galerie Supportico Lopez (curatorial space), MOD Institute (an urban action and research institute), Judith Raum (visual artist), and Tanya Leighton Gallery (commercial art gallery). 

My internship was very eye-opening, because I didn't know much about the refugee crisis that happens here in Berlin. Through my work I learned about communication, about organization, to be proactive and get involved into communities, and to look deeper into where you're living and think that there is more than what meets the eye. That is a life lesson that will never be complete, that will continue to evolve, and that hopefully I can share with other people."
--Sylvie Estes (USA), who interned through the Presbitarian Church Organization that provides housing for refugees or migrant workers

Courses 

Here is a selection of course offerings for Spring 2017 in the practising arts, art history, philosophy, literature and theater. Please see the full course list for the complete range of courses accessible through enrolment in the "Arts & Society in Berlin" program.

AH208 Pablo Picasso

Module: Artists, Genres, Movements

Instructor: Geoff Lehman

Credits: 8 ECTS , 4 U.S. credits

Course Times: Tue 17:00 - 18:30, Fri 13:30 - 16:45 (long session for offsite trips)

This course focuses on the paintings, drawings, and prints of Pablo Picasso. Berlin’s Berggruen Museum, with its collection of works by Picasso from every period of his long career, is a major resource, and visits to this museum, as well as other Berlin museums and galleries, form an integral part of the course. Topics for the course include: cubism, with special attention to its central role within the modernist avant-garde; collage, semiotics, and the problem of interpretation; sex, self-reflexivity, and personal iconography; theme and variation as pictorial practice; and the relationship to, and subversion of, the Renaissance tradition. We will consider works by Picasso in a wide range of styles created between the 1890s and the 1970s, and seminars will focus on close readings of a small number of major works within this oeuvre (the Demoiselles d’Avignon, the collages of 1911-12, Guernica, the Las Meninas series – to name just a few). Picasso’s ongoing dialogue with Henri Matisse will also be a focus, with careful attention to the works by both artists in the Berggruen Museum. Readings include works by art critics and art historians (Clark, Krauss, Steinberg, Malraux, Kahnweiler) as well as literary and philosophical texts, and we will examine, among others, semiotic, contextualist, formalist, phenomenological, and psychoanalytic approaches to Picasso’s work, always in the context of interpreting specific works of art.

Syllabus

AH302 The Idea of the Aesthetic

Module: Aesthetics and Art Theory

Instructor: Katalin Makkai

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

Course Times: Mon 13:30 - 15:00, Wed 13:30 - 15:00

“Aesthetics” and “aesthetic” are terms that are often taken for granted inside as well as outside academic discourse. We speak of aesthetic experiences and judgments and qualities, and we employ “aesthetics” to designate the study of such matters. Although their root is taken from the Greek, the now-familiar terms (in their now-familiar usages) are, however, comparatively new. They are commonly regarded as having been introduced into the philosophical lexicon in the eighteenth century—a few hundred years ago. This course studies some of the texts that were key to the discovery, or perhaps the invention, of the “aesthetic”. What work was the “aesthetic” meant to do? How did its evolution retain or reconfigure its original senses and purposes? Is the idea of the “aesthetic” problematic, ideological, or chimerical? Do we need an idea of the “aesthetic” to think about contemporary art? Do we need such an idea to think about nature and our relation to it? Authors may include Shaftesbury, Hutcheson, Hume, Kant, Schiller, Schopenhauer, Coleridge, Bell, Beardsley, Bullough, Stolnitz, Isenberg, Dickie, Greenberg, Carroll, Bernstein, Rancière.

Syllabus

AR311 Curatorial Practice, Past and Present

Module: Exhibition Culture and Public Space

Instructor: Aya Soika

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

Course Times: Wed 9:00 - 10.30, Fri 9:45 - 12:30 (offsite visits every second week)

Curatorial Practice involves a careful consideration of thematic, pedagogical, and aesthetic concerns. The course assesses the disclosure of such concerns in the structure of the exhibition form over time, drawing on a variety of museum collections and art spaces in Berlin. Our investigation begins with an exploration of some of the past, present and future challenges curators, conservators and archivists have faced on the Berlin Museum Island as well as at the Hamburger Bahnhof museum of contemporary art. We concentrate on the underlying debates concerning the complex dynamics between questions of display, the demands of conservation and the need for accessibility in the light of an increase in visitor numbers. The second part of the course is dedicated to smaller houses and art spaces as well private collections and galleries. Here, we discuss in greater detail the process of framing: the relationship between individual works, the role of the spectator and the conceptual rationale of curatorial choice as well as the significance of different settings. Conversations with curators and critics, conservator-restorers and dealers will be part of the course. Readings include art-historical, essays in the field of museum studies, as well as recent interviews and selected websites/online sources. 

Syllabus

AR312 Contemporary Narratives in New Media: Systems, Mechanisms, and the Instruments of Power

Module: Law and Society/Media, Practices, Techniques/Critical and Cultural Theory

Cross-listed with Art and Aesthetics, Literature and Rhetoric

Instructor: Heba Amin

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

Course Times: Wed 15:15 - 18:30

This course will examine the domain of critical social practice and the broad range of art and artists who scrutinize systems of power and data-gathering methods utilized by current industries and governments. Who has control over information? What role do artists play in maintaining sovereignty of information? How can they contribute to the protection of data and privacy? Students will explore works of art that utilize forms of hacking, intervention, cloning, surveillance, and parody to critique and challenge pre-existing systems, mechanisms, and instruments of power. They will addresses “new media” as a medium that critically questions the influences of contemporary technology, and explore ownership of identity within the context of contemporary technological constructs. This course will help students nurture their skills in social analysis and criticism through their art and design practice. Lectures and regular exercises will introduce students to conceptual works of art that relay new meanings through the manipulation and social re-engineering of techno-semiotic structures. Students may work with graphics, computer hardware, software, video, the body, and public space among other resources and tools.

Syllabus

FM228 Star Trek: The Final Frontier and Beyond

Module: Artists, Genres, Movements

Instructor: Matthias Hurst

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

Course Times: Tue 17:00 - 18:30 and 19:30 - 21:00 (film screenings), Thu 17:00 - 18:30

Fifty years ago – on September 8, 1966 – Star Trek  launched the most famous TV spaceship, the Enterprise,  to cross the final frontier, to discover new worlds and “boldly go” where no man (or no “one” as the phrase was later updated) had gone before. The science fiction genre in film and television features fantastic sights that are at the same time utopian and dystopian imaginings of the actual future: hypermodern cities, distant planets, new forms of life, travel, and conflict, and new kinds of machine that threaten to surpass the intelligence and control of their makers. Science fiction is a narrative means of exploring issues of general interest (whether anthropological, cultural, technological or social and political). This is not only true of Star Trek the original series (1966-1969), but of its many spin-offs with their fictional history of the 23rd century. At the heart of Star Trek we find an optimistic outlook for the future of humanity, a philosophy of tolerance and an appreciation of diversity, but also a sense of constant threat and challenge. As the producer of the show, Gene Rodenberry, commented on the worldview of the series: the future—always assuming the human species survives to see it—promises the realisation that “differences in ideas and attitudes are a delight, part of life’s exciting variety, not something to fear.”  The course explores the aesthetics of the science fiction film and TV genre through a focus on Star Trek, and the means it chooses for intervening in cultural transformation, and creating entertainment value. 

Syllabus

AH212 German Art and Identity

Module: Art and Artists in Context

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

Instructor: Aya Soika

Course Times: Wed 11:00 - 12:30, Fri 9:45 - 12:30 (offsite visits every second week)

The nineteenth century was the great age of “nationalism,” or the belief that the ideal political configuration was the linguistically and culturally unified population formed into a state. Nationalism was in part a progressive movement, reacting to rule by aristocratic hierarchies, imperial control, or conquering foreign powers. It also developed reactionary components, relying on notions of race or of ethnic homogenity that were dangerously exclusionary or even annhilatory. Art has played a contradictory role in regard to nationalism, contributing to or appropriated by it to establish narratives of the history of a “people,” yet also attacking such constructs by dismantling the tropes they exploit. The relation between art and nationalism is particularly complex in the German case because of the territorial intricacy of the lands in which vernacular German-speakers or those claiming some kind of German identity lived. It is also complicated by an historical antithesis between German culture and the styles of expression that were defined as most desirable for art and for civilized life. This course traces the relationship between German art and German identity from the period that is seen as the first manifestation of a specifically “German” proto-national identity, the Reformation, through the Romantic movement that arose in the period of Napoleonic occupation, up to the modern critiques (and violent enforcements) of a “national” aesthetic in the twentieth century. 

Syllabus

FM216 Order and Chaos – The Films of Fritz Lang

Modules: Approaching Arts Through Theory/Theater and Film

Instructor: Matthias Hurst

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

Course Times: Mon 13:30 - 15:00 and 19:30 - 21:00 (film screenings), Wed 13:30 - 15:00

Fritz Lang (1890 - 1976) started his career as a filmmaker in Germany in the 1920s, becoming one of the most prolific and renowned – and uncompromising – directors of Weimar cinema. With films like Dr. Mabuse (1922), Die Nibelungen (1924), Metropolis (1927) and M (1931) he created visually stunning representations of social anxiety, and contributed to the emerging film genres of crime film, fantasy, science fiction and psychological thriller, defining new standards in mass entertainment and the art of film. In 1934 he emigrated to the US and continued his career as director of Western films, anti-Nazi films and crime dramas in the film noir tradition. Lang’s films of the German period and of the American period might differ in style and scope but they very often share a specific mindset of pessimism and bleakness in depicting an ongoing struggle between order and chaos, on both individual and social levels. Discussing selected films by Lang, we will also explore concepts of film aesthetics and cinematic language, styles of filmic presentation and different approaches to film analysis and interpretation.

Syllabus

FA206 Photography: Cut with a Kitchen Knife

Module: Media, Practices, Techniques

Instructor: April Gertler

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

Course Times: Thu 13:30 - 16:45

Berlin has a tremendous photographic history which is evident in the variety shown by  commercial galleries and project spaces devoted to this medium. The city’s political and cultural transitions over the last 100 years have created a diverse backdrop which has been used by countless photographers. The photo class Cut with a Kitchen Knife (referencing a collage work by one of Berlin’s photographic icons, Hannah Höch) will pay homage to some of the most historically significant Berlin-based photographers while concentrating on helping students develop their work through directed projects throughout the semester. There will be two main points of focus for the class; using the city of Berlin as a springboard for specific projects that transcend the usual clichés that occur in photographing a city and working in the darkroom on innovative printing techniques. 

The student must have a clear understanding of how to use a 35mm manual film camera, work in the darkroom, be able to mix chemistry and print their own images. Therefore it is a requirement that students have their own cameras and submit a portfolio of 3-5 black and white photographic prints not larger than A4 or 8"x10" in size to April Gertler (at the main college address) prior to enrolling in the class. If a student has completed the beginner's photography course at either Bard College Berlin or Bard Annandale they are automatically allowed to take this course.

Please note there is a materials fee of approximately €100 for this course (not applicable to visiting Arts & Society or LAB students) which covers the cost of film and paper.

Syllabus

FA316 From natural history to “after nature”: Berlin as studio

Module: Media, Practices, Techniques

Instructor: Ana María Gomez Lopez

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

Course Times: Sat 13:30 - 18:45 (nine Saturdays)

This studio-intensive course aims to strengthen students’ artistic practice by engaging with ideas of the “natural” in present-day Berlin. Students will initiate work under the broad theme of the “natural”, responding individually with projects inspired by scientific collections, rare manuscripts, and outdoor spaces unique to Berlin. Class assignments during the first half of the course will focus on the body, examination of physical traces, and engagement with the surrounding environment; the second half is devoted entirely to each student’s individual project. Direct contact with specimens, recordings, prints, and artifacts during site visits will serve as prompts for hands-on exercises and independent work in studio. Themes that integrate class excursions, readings, and group discussions include the relationship between the human and the non-human, the development of ecological thinking, and historical definitions of life. Weekly critiques will help students identify the formal, subjective, and conceptual underpinnings that motivate their artwork. Experimentation with materials and across media is welcome; however, students are highly encouraged to concentrate on either two- dimensional, three-dimensional, or time-based media and performance for their final project, in order to better address concerns specific to each medium and support individual progress.

Please note there is a materials fee of approximately €100 for this course (not applicable to visiting Arts & Society or LAB students). 

Syllabus

FM312 DIY VIDEO - Autobiography as Process and Performance in Video

Module: Media, Practices, Techniques

Instructor: Dafna Maimon

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

Course Times: Tue 13:30 - 16:45

Many video artists appear in their works, and turn the lens onto their own lives, environments and bodies. This class will explore the ways in which autobiography and DIY approaches can function as a performative tool for making video art. We will create performances or live situations, which when filmed become independent video works that transcend documentation. We will also experiment with the way a video work is shown in relationship to the space around it, which may include live elements and objects outside of the realm of the screen. We will work on creating an interplay between performance and video and between physical and non-physical dimensions. The class focus will be on the “making” of video work, putting the artist’s process and experimentation in the foreground. In this approach an end result will be considered only a momentary pause within a longer trajectory; each work can be seen as an episode or variation in an ongoing series. The aim is to reach a continuous rigorous practice and dialogue that draws from an independent performative visual language. We will analyze documentary and fiction works from video artists, who work with performance as their starting point and who utilize the very means they have directly at hand, as well as visit Berlin artists using these techniques in their studios. Many of the classes will have an on-site collaborative workshop format.

Please note there is a materials fee of approximately €100 for this course (not applicable to visiting Arts & Society or LAB students). 

Syllabus

FM313 Dream Scene Studio

Module: Media, Practices, Techniques

Instructor: Deville Cohen

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

Course Times: Wed 15:15 - 18:30

The concept of a dream scene adds another layer of awareness and subconsciousness to the system of symbols and representations of a fictional project. In this studio/video class, students will work with sculptural and performative techniques to create video works with a focus on developing an idiosyncratic visual language and concept. Each project will need to have a clear vision and structure while integrating a dream scene within it. We will look at dream scenes in TV shows, films, and literature to research classic concepts and possible executions of the “dream scene” as a dramatic device or psychological agent (such as Hitchcock’s Spellbound designed by Salvador Dali, Cronenberg's Videodrome, Lynch’s Lost Highway, among others).

The introduction of the video camera into the artist’s studio brings narrative into the sculptural process; materials, tools and techniques become characters and formal decisions become fictions. We will read post-dramatic and performance texts that study the connection between sculpture, theater, performance and video. In the prototype phase the students will begin by working on small scale ideas in the studio with a variety of materials to create drawings, collages, and models. As they develop the conceptual and visual language of their projects, students learn how to create a storyboard and a production schedule. The limitation of the project to the artist's studio scale forces participants to push the limitations of production value with their available resources. Students will also be exposed to studio and video production skills using DSLR cameras, lighting equipment, and post-production techniques (video and audio editing).

Please note there is a materials fee of approximately €100 for this course (not applicable to visiting Arts & Society or LAB students). 

Syllabus

FA111 Hands-On: Exploring Methods Towards a Personal Sculpting Practice

Module: Art Objects and Experience

Instructor: John von Bergen

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

Course Times: Mon 15:15 - 18:30

As with previous Bard College Berlin sculpture courses, we will investigate a wide range of conceptual platforms and material decisions for beginning art students. Potential materials for production may include wood, styrofoam, plaster, clays, rubbers, plastics, polymers, wax and found objects. Many techniques will be explored for incorporating “materials” in art. In the first half of the semester, students are expected to respond to intense weekly deadlines with a new project challenge every week. Class time will usually be divided between workshop production and critique. Students learn the importance of preparation, safety, and cleanup while working hands-on at Bard College Berlin’s factory building. The second half of the semester invites larger, ambitious projects to be developed from personal initiative. Projects may involve room installation, collaboration with other students, as well as outdoor projects as the weather begins to get warmer. No practicing art experience is necessary for this class, but an ambitious attitude along with a serious commitment to working independently outside of class time will be essential for this course. Students with previous sculpture experience would of course be welcome to enroll, and could undertake projects befitting their level of expertise.

Please note there is a materials fee of approximately €100 for this course (not applicable to visiting Arts & Society or LAB students). 

Syllabus

FA103 Found Fragments & Layered Lines: mixed-media techniques for drawing and collage

Module: Art Objects and Experience

Instructor: John Kleckner

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

Course Times: Fri 13:30 - 16:45

This is a hands-on studio art course exploring contemporary and historical approaches to drawing and collage. The class projects are designed to exercise each student’s skills in visual thinking through the creation of drawings on paper and collages of found printed fragments. Students will gather printed materials from Berlin’s famous Flohmärkte (flea markets) to use in creating original collages; students will also draw dynamic object arrangements, make abstractions from nature by working outdoors, work collaboratively on large-scale drawings, develop their own systematic approach for generating compositions, and experiment with the expressive possibilities of combining text and imagery. A central focus will be examining the potential to create new and surprising meanings and contexts resulting from the juxtaposition and layering of image fragments together. The semester culminates in the creation of a body of original artwork that will be shown in a class exhibition. The majority of classes are studio sessions. There will also be a number of group critiques, image presentations, and several artist studio / gallery visits. The ideal student will be highly motivated, with a strong interest in studying and producing art, and must be comfortable with presenting their artistic creations with peers in class discussions.

Please note there is a materials fee of approximately €100 for this course (not applicable to visiting Arts & Society or LAB students). 

Syllabus

LT212 Reading into Writing: A Fiction Workshop

Module: Literary Analysis and Cultural Production

Instructor: Paul Festa

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

Course Times: Thu 13:30 - 16:45

Every writer learns the craft by reading. This course, open to students of any level, focuses on that process of self-expression through analysis, criticism, absorption and invention. Each week students will read and write; they will also assume the role of editor in critiquing each other’s work. Readings from masters of short and long fiction, and of criticism, will inform exercises in plot and closure; dialogue; character development, point of view and voice; figurative language, style and genre; action, atmosphere and description; the persistent alternative between showing and telling; and techniques of revision, excision and rewriting. Online or in-person classroom encounters with authors on the syllabus are planned. We’ll look at fiction and criticism by writers including Gustave Flaubert, Virginia Woolf, Anton Chekhov, Edward St. Aubyn, Alice Munro, Paul La Farge, Alexander Chee, James Baldwin, Jennifer Egan, James Wood, John Updike, Jonathan Franzen, George Saunders and Francine Prose. 

Syllabus

TH320 Social Theatre for Intervention and Consciousness-Raising

Module: Literary Analysis and Cultural Production/Social Commitment and the Public Sphere

Cross-listed with Politics

Instructor: Pepetual Mforbe Chiangong

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

Course Times: Sat 13:30 - 16:45

The first part of this course, mainly theory-oriented, will focus on an overview of various forms of intervention theatre across the globe. At this level of discussing intervention theatre, theoretical references will be made to Paulo Freire’s concept of problem-posing education and to Augusto Boal’s “Poetics of the Oppressed”. The reading of excerpts from Freire’s Pedagogy of the Oppressed and Boal’s Theatre of the Oppressed will serve as a foundation for critical reflection and preparation of the performer’s body for a participatory theatrical workshop. The topic of migration which today informs both public and political discourses will be the major subject requiring both critical reflection and theatrical improvisation. This brings us to the second part of the seminar which will be mainly practical and will introduce the students to a 5 days intensive intervention theatre workshop on migration. Discussions during the workshop will turn around migration and its connections to objectification, otherness, and subjectification. During the workshop, participants will also be expected to participate in discussions that highlight the role played by trans- and inter- and cross-culturality in regard to the topic of migration, and also how migration touches on other social issues. This discussions will enable us to decide, as a class, on the kind of intervention, “soft” or “hard”,  that will be necessary to raise the consciousness of course participants and of the wider public on the subject of migration. After critical reflections, course participants will be expected to create a play and do open performances during which the public will not only be brought to a heightened awareness of the problems of migration, but also encouraged to give their feedback about the play and the topic of migration. 

Syllabus

TH338 Faust

Modules: Author and Influence/Media, Practices, Techniques

Cross-listed with Art and Aesthetics

Instructor: Julia Hart

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits

Course Times: Fri 13:30 - 16:45

Goethe's Faust is the most performed play on the German stage. To this day, Faust continues to draw the largest audiences nationwide. Yet how have German theater artists tackled this classical work in recent years? And how can theatermakers approach this work today? This course will look at landmark productions of Faust starting in the second half of the 20th century through today including: the Deutsches Schauspielhaus production starring Gustaf Gründgens (1956), Einar Schleef's production at Schauspiel Frankfurt (1990), Peter Stein's complete staging of Faust I and Faust II (2000), Michael Thalheimer's production at the Deutsches Theater Berlin (2005), Nicolas Stemann's acclaimed Thalia Theater production (2011), and finally Robert Wilson's recent production at the Berliner Ensemble. What can these acclaimed Faust productions tell us about current developments in the German theater? How do they reflect different approaches to theater and the changing political climate in Germany? In this course, students will watch footage and archival material of past Faust productions and attend current productions in Berlin. Together we will analyze staging devices as well as acting and directing techniques. In addition to this aesthetic analysis, students will act and direct key scenes from Faust, experimenting with specific theater techniques discussed in class.

Please note there is a materials fee of approximately €100 for this course (not applicable to visiting Arts & Society or LAB students). 

Syllabus

IS331 Berlin Internship Seminar: Working Cultures, Urban Cultures

Instructor: Agata Lisiak

Credits: 8 ECTS, 4 U.S. credits (in combination with an internship)

Course Times: Wed 9:00 - 10:30 (Group A), Wed 10:45 - 12:15 (Group B)

The Berlin Internship Seminar accompanies students’ undertaking of an internship or period of practical training, and addresses such issues as: the successful functioning of institutions, the role of guiding principles and values in determining the direction and structure of projects and initiatives, and the relationship between the various spheres of society (the EU, the state, the market, and the individual) in influencing the way institutions operate. Over the course of the seminar we will also talk about contemporary ways of living and working in Berlin and beyond: How is work organized temporally and spatially and how does it, in turn, affect the city and its residents? What distinguishes the spaces in which we live and work today? Which new forms of work have emerged in Berlin recently? Which of them seem to thrive? How do Berlin’s political, artistic, and citizen-activist organizations operate? What can we learn from these institutions? 

Syllabus

German Beginner A1, Beginner A2, Intermediate B1, German Intermediate B2, Advanced C1, and Advanced C2


Application info 

The Institute for International Liberal Education at Bard College is responsible for the administration of the "Arts & Society in Berlin" Study Abroad Program and assists North American students through the application, selection, and pre-departure processes. For more information and to apply, please visit: www.bard.edu/bardabroad/berlin/academics/. Please direct your questions and expressions of interest to: studyabroad@bard.edu

Students from European and other non-North American universities interested in the program should contact admissions@berlin.bard.edu to learn more about the application process.